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March 12, 1864

Mr E drilling the Home Guards. Father very busy putting down his long projected Flume. To me it seems but the beginning of sorrows. He was unfortunate in having rain after so long a spell of fine weather to begin it in & today all hands are driven from the work by a sudden & rapid rise in the river. He dined here today & yesterday but left hurriedly for fear of being cut off by the water in the Beaver Dam. Sarah Dunlop & her sister & their escort home, Mr Corbin Carr, also dined with us. Set two Dorking Hens on 24 eggs & 4 Bremen Geese on forty eight today. Ah! Mrs Edmondston you were born methinks “to love pigs & chickens.”

Gen Ransom has seized & holds Suffolk & has beaten up Butler’s quarters within five miles of Norfolk. Well done General Mat! I ought to quote to myself the adage “A prophet is not without honour,” etc., for certainly I never expected it of him but was prepared for failure when I heard he was in command. The victory in Florida most decisive. The Yankee press are bitter over the fact that 2500 lives were lost in an attempt to secure an Electoral vote for Mr Lincoln. How does the dear people like that? Bombardment of the forts below Mobile has commenced. I wonder whether in earnest or not? But time will show.

Source: Edmondston, Catherine Ann Devereux, 1823-1875, Journal of a Secesh Lady: The Diary of Catherine Ann Devereux Edmondston 1860-1866. Crabtree, Beth G and Patton, James W., (Raleigh, NC: North Carolina Division of Archives and History, 1979).http://nc-historical-publications.stores.yahoo.net/478.html

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Confederate Ten Dollar Bill. Collections of North Carolina State Historic Sites, Accession Number 2008.60.6.

Confederate Ten Dollar Bill. Collections of North Carolina State Historic Sites, Accession Number 2008.60.6.

Confederate Ten Dollar Bill. Engraving of four horses pulling a caisson and cannon at center.  Portrait of Confederate Cabinet Member R.M.T. Hunter. Dated February 17th, 1864.

Confederate Ten Dollar Bill, Reverse. Collections of North Carolina State Historic Sites, Accession Number 2008.60.6.

Confederate Ten Dollar Bill, Reverse. Collections of North Carolina State Historic Sites, Accession Number 2008.60.6.

Source: Collections of North Carolina State Historic Sites, Accession Number 2008.60.6.

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Slave made table with carved legs from  Franklin County, NC.  Collections of the NC Museum of History, Accession Number 1998.145.1.

Slave made table with carved legs from Franklin County, NC. Collections of the NC Museum of History, Accession Number 1998.145.1.

 

Small black walnut table carved by a slave on plantation owned by William Pace of Franklin County, North Carolina 1850-1865.

Curator Notes: Two-board table top shaped with scalloped edges. The center drawer features a slightly bow-shaped front with a horizontal diamond carved at the center front. The outstanding features of the table are the legs which are carved in the shape of a man with upraised arms supporting the table. Each figure has defined facial and torso features and articulated legs that end in a trifid foot. The facial features look distinctly African while two of the figures wear bowler hats and the other two wear waistcoats. Each figure seems to have a frock coat on with tails at the back. The male figures on each of the legs has been slightly altered. Each originally had an erect penis located at the crotch but during the 1920s the grandmother of the donor had them removed because she found them vulgar and offensive.

Head detail. Slave made table with carved legs from  Franklin County, NC.  Collections of the NC Museum of History, Accession Number 1998.145.1.

Head detail. Slave made table with carved legs from Franklin County, NC. Collections of the NC Museum of History, Accession Number 1998.145.1.

Leg detail. Slave made table with carved legs from  Franklin County, NC.  Collections of the NC Museum of History, Accession Number 1998.145.1.

Leg detail. Slave made table with carved legs from Franklin County, NC. Collections of the NC Museum of History, Accession Number 1998.145.1.

Leg detail. Slave made table with carved legs from  Franklin County, NC.  Collections of the NC Museum of History, Accession Number 1998.145.1.

Leg detail. Slave made table with carved legs from Franklin County, NC. Collections of the NC Museum of History, Accession Number 1998.145.1.

Source: North Carolina Museum of History, accession number 1998.145.1.  Search our collections here.

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Friday January 22nd 1864

Was invited by Capt. Edward White, Asst. Agt Genl (who was commissioned to invite some Gentlemen) to a party given by a Miss Major.

Had a most agreeable time indeed. The party broke up about 1 o’clock the next day & I went to Jarratts Hotel & remained there till about 4 ½ AM & started for the Depot to take the train for Richmond where I was going to see about my appointment as Asst Adjt Genl to Clingman’s Brigd. Weather fair & moderate.

Source: Diary of William H S Burgwyn, North Carolina State Archives and found on www.ncecho.org

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Silk Dress (1850-1860) worn by Isabella Margaret Cuthbert Bragg, wife of Governor Bragg (1855-1859). Two piece dress with red, green, black, and white silk plaid with brown ribbon stripes. Three stitched, boned darts on each side of bodice front.

Isabella Bragg's dress, ca 1850-1860, North Carolina Museum of History Collections, Accession number 1989.87.1

Isabella Bragg’s dress, ca 1850-1860, North Carolina Museum of History Collections, Accession number 1989.87.1

Pleated pagoda sleeves trimmed with embroidered fringe braid. Hand sewn bodice.  All seams corded, hook and eye closure with tan cambric lining.  “I.Bragg” written on lower section of the bodice. Machine-sewn skirt features four gores with inverted pleats at center front and on each side outlined with velvet braid and an acorn drop. Skirt originally hemmed by hand but re-hemmed with sewing machine. Alterations to both sleeve and skirt in modern times and worn to historical celebrations.

Isabella Bragg's dress, detail, ca 1850-1860, North Carolina Museum of History Collections, Accession number 1989.87.1

Isabella Bragg’s dress, detail, ca 1850-1860, North Carolina Museum of History Collections, Accession number 1989.87.1

Detail, Isabella Bragg's dress, ca 1850-1860, North Carolina Museum of History Collections, Accession number 1989.87.1

Detail, Isabella Bragg’s dress, ca 1850-1860, North Carolina Museum of History Collections, Accession number 1989.87.1

Source: North Carolina Museum of History, Accession number H.1989.87.1.

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North Carolina State Flag, 35th Regiment NC Troops, North Carolina Museum of History, Accession Number 19xx.146.35

North Carolina State Flag, 35th Regiment NC Troops, North Carolina Museum of History, Accession Number 19xx.146.35

North Carolina Civil War Flag, 35th Regiment North Carolina Troops.  The 35th was organized at Camp Crabtree near Raleigh in 1861 and probably received this flag in early 1862. The flag is a North Carolina State flag and originally featured the unit’s number designation, which was cut away, possibly as a souvenir. The dates on the flag represent the date of the Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence (May 20th, 1775) and the date of North Carolina’s secession (May 20th, 1861).   The flag was likely captured in 1862 at the Battle of Sharpsburg/Antietam.  Historians have come to this conclusion based on the United States’ War Department capture number “107” stenciled on the flag. The War’s Department’s “Record of Rebel flags captured by Union troops since April 19, 1861” lists this flag among others captured at that battle.

 Wool, handsewn except for hem and seam of red stripe with appliqued star and embroidered letters, the flag measures approximately 6’ x 4’.

Source: North Carolina Museum of History, Accession number 19xx.146.35

 

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December 25, 1863

CHRISTMAS

        The first sound that greeted me this morning was the little negroes in the yard running about before light holloring Christmas gift to the other negroes–Christmas has once more come with its joyous sports. The little chaps enjoy it wonderfully. I have remained at home the entire day, as usual eating my Christmas dinner at home. And although the times are “hard” Mother had provided a good dinner for us. Several dined with us, viz Sam’l McGee, Larkin, Anna & Maggie Agnew. A poor soldier (32nd Miss) who has lost an arm (named Brock, who lives near Parson Scally’s) called this morning wanting a “lift” on the road home. He is weak, having been furloughed last Saturday from the Fair Ground Hospital of Atlanta for 60 days. Pa sent him on a mule to Mr. Armor’s. Wiley went along to bring the mules back. Jno. Martin and Johny and Claudius Nelson were here a while this evening. These were our visitors for the day. Early heard some big Christmas guns but not many.

        Have some news. Mr. Brock gave Pa a Mississippian of the 20th from which I have gleaned some items. The Yankees have made a raid on the Tennessee Railroad at Salem Va, west of Lynchburg. Some trussells were destroyed and Longstreet’s supply route cut. From Longstreet see nothing very definite. On the 14th there was a battle (not general) at Bean’s Station in which the Yankees were driven towares Knoxville. From Bragg’s army see nothing in the paper except that a reported raid towards Athens, Ga. was unfounded.

        From Texas see that Banks is gaining a lodgement in the state having and holding Brownsville, Corpus Christi, Aransas Post and Matagorda. This was in November and Banks is having much more success than I had heard of. In the U. S. Congress F. Wood had introduced a resolution directing the Pres. to appoint 3 Commissioners to negotiate a peace &c. The resolution was tabled by a large majority. This proposal would have resulted in nothing, for they looked to a restoration of the Union, but the U. S. Congress plainly declares they do not want peace now, and are not willing to make such propositions. Mr. McGee tells me Dr. Ford returned from the Georgia army yesterday. He reports them going into winter quarters at Dalton, a portion of the army is at Tunnel Hill fortifying: an attack of the enemy is looked for at Tunnel Hill. Gen. Jo. Johnston has gone on to assume the command of the army, and doubtless commands now in place of Hardee. Heard that it was reported this morning that the Yankees were up on 20 mile Creek, but as I have heard nothing more suppose it was a false report. McGee tells me he heard yesterday that the cavalry are moving up. They are certainly at work on the R. R. repairing to Tupelo at least. The day has been cloudy. Tonight a heavy mist is falling and we have the prospect of a wet night, Pa is reading The Message from the Sea tonight. It is a Christmas Story by Charles Dickens.

Source: Samuel Andrew Agnew Diary, Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

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