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Old Capital Prison

Washington City D. C.

Oct. 14th/64

My dear Father

I received a very kind & affectionate letter from Uncle David yesterday enclosing me $100.00 from him & offering more as Mr Dehon was not in the City. He also wrote desiring me to come and stay with him as a prisoner if possible; he said he had received a letter from Mother which was “as a star in a cloudy night” & the only letter received from any of the family in over three years. he himself is in very feeble health & walks with difficulty with the help of a stick but all of his family are well. Mr Dehon is also in very bad health & consequently spends but little of his time in Boston but is expected there every day. Uncle David’s address in No 40 State St Boston Mass.

Mr Sumner he writes has been dead about three years. With the help of the $100.00 I will get along very well. I wrote asking Mr Dehon to get me a pr of pants jacket & vest of grey cloth which will make me quite comfortable. The only drawback or want experienced is books but I think I may buy some. I have sent for Shakespears works pocket edition.  I am in hopes of hearing at any day from home. Never forget to write particularly how is the health of those at home & the Devereux family.  I am in very good health & only very anxious to get exchanged. Write frequently and address your letter to Capt W. H. Hatch Asst Agent of Exchange War Department Richmond Va or to Col Ould & they will be sent here. Write if my horses trunks & Pompey got home safely. My best love to all dear Father.

Your most affet Son

  1. H. S. Burgwyn Capt & A.A. Genls

Clingman’s Brigade

 

Source: WHS Burgwyn Papers, State Archives of North Carolina as found on www.ncecho.org

Boston

Oct 11.1864

Capt W. H. S. Burgwyn

A.A.G. Genl  Clingman’s Brigade

Old Capitol Prison

Washington, D.C.

My dear nephew

Last evening I received yours of 6th inst informing me of your captivity & destitute condition. At the earliest moment this morning I sought Mr. Debow, who is absent. I am sorry I cannot come to you in person, but I am a cripple, barely able to totter about with help of a stick. I however enclose five twenty dollar U S treasury notes, & send them by what I believe to be a safe & speedy conveyance, hoping they may ameliorate your condition till you can hear from Mr. Debow. You do not say that you are hurt & I trust therefore that you are uninjured. Mr. Debow is expected home daily, and as soon as he arrives I will inform him of your situation. His health is not good & he is absent a great deal on that account.

I suppose it cannot be contraband to add that my family are well & all desire the kindest remembrance to you. Your namesake on the hill has been dead nearly three years. We had a letter from your mother a few weeks since the first for three or more years. It came by permission of the authorities & was like a star in a cloudy night.

Write me when you can, and let me know if I can do any thing to render your condition more comfortable. If the thing is possible we should like to have you here, as prisoner, if on no better terms. What do you say.

My Post Office address is Boston, No. 40 State St. & I am

Afftely yours

  1. J. Greenough

P.S. Advise me if the money comes to hand & if you want more

 

Source: WHS Burgwyn Papers, State Archives of North Carolina as found on www.ncecho.org

 

Telegram to Col. H.K. Burgwyn: 
October 2, 1864
Your son Capt Burgwyn was captured by the Enemy sept 30th near Chaffins Bluff. 
A. M. Erwing Maj
Telegram sent to Raleigh from Petersburg.  North Carolina State Archives, WHS Burgwyn Papers.

Telegram sent to Raleigh from Petersburg. North Carolina State Archives, WHS Burgwyn Papers.

A brush with Yankee Gunboats

On last Thursday, quite a spirited little brush came off between a small detatchment of our troops, and some yankee gunboats which attempted to go up the Scuppernong river, in which the Yankees came out second best. On attempting to ascend the river, two boats were attacked and forced back by Lt. Sharpe, commanding Capt. Pitt’s company of cavalry, assisted by two pieces of artillery under Lt. Williams, of Lee’s Light Battery, and by Lt. McWatson of the 50th NC with thirty infantry.

One of the boats got aground about 700 yards from the shore, at the mouth of the river, where she was well peppered, for some time, by both our artillery and sharpshooters, one shot striking her near the waterline. So hot was the fire upon this craft, that the Yankees were all driven from their guns. Three more gunboats at length came up to their relief and opened fiercely on our little party, who courageously held their ground and fought them till the approach of night and scarcity of ammunition admonished them to retire beyond the range of the enemy’s guns.

We had three men slightly wounded and our howitzer was somewhat damaged by a shell. The enemy’s loss has not been ascertained but it must have been considerable, as their wooden gunboat was aground and under the fire of our artillery for some three hours, and it was well ascertained that every man had to seek shelter below from the deadly aim of our sharpshooters.

 

Source: Fayetteville Observer, October 10, 1864 as found on www.ncecho.org.

Ft. Holmes

Octo 6th 1864

Dear Wife

As Lt Luten is to start for his home this morning I cannot let the opportunity pass of writing you a letter altho I have written but a few days ago by Burt Jones. I am in good health and spirits and have not many sick in my company now and what are sick are not dangerously so. I am getting along quite well as yet for something to eat as the provisions that Macon Harrison and I bought is not gone yet, but I can assure you the times are hard here for those that cant get something from home. We cannot make a 1/3 of a pound of Nassau pork last do the best we can and now the Genl has prohibited our going sticking with a light at night so you see one of my best sources of supply is cut off as Mars cant go sticking. Nevertheless we shant starve as the creeks are full of oysters and we can catch a few fish at odd chances. There is some news now from our armies. We had a fith a week ago at Petersburgh and lost some of our works but killed and captured over 5000 of the enemy and lost 5 to 700 on our side. Hood has got in the rear of Sherman in Georgia and it is said he will be forced to fight nim now and our people think that we will give the old devil a thrashing this time and no mistake. Genl Beauregard has been taken from us and put in command of all the SW to the Mississippi river and is now aiding Hood in Georgia. He is on our side and Hood on the other of Sherman. The Yankees are making superhuman efforts to capture Richmond before the election as that will insure Lincoln’s election by a big majority. God grant us the victory. Our two inlets are almost hermectically sealed now and not a single vessel has come in or gone out this month I believe. One attempted to come in at Fisher on last Saturday night and was chased and fired into so that they had to beach her to keep her from sinking. In the hurry of getting to the coasts the crew upset one that Mrs. Rose Greenhow was in and she got drowned. Her body was found next day and she had on her person 4000 dollars in gold. She was a woman of a good deal of notoriety in our cause and had been in prison in Washington City a long time. There are eleven blockaders off our bar and fourteen off Fisher.  This morning the government has advertised some cloth for the officers of this command and I have written up to secure enough for a suit of clothes and if I get it I will write you and the first opportunity you can get you can send to Wilson and get that there at Elizas and make clothes for the children out of it as I shall not need it all. I sent over the river on yesterday to see what I can get salt at and find I can buy it at 22 ½ per bushel and think of buying 6 bushels and will try to get it up to Wilson so that you can send for it there. Miles promised to get salt for you but I fear to trust him as he made the same promise last year. I shall have to borrow some money to pay for it, but salt you must have cost what it may. I have more than enough money in the Zills Sands at Wilmington to pay for the cloth if I get it. I am going to send my two game chickens up to Wilson today by Tom Sutterthwait and get Eliza to take care of them for me until you can get them. Tom is going up today on a sick furlough of 30 days. Give my love to all our dear little ones and kiss them all for their papa just such a kiss as you give him darling. I hope you are all well now. Give my respects to all the negroes. Excuse this short note wife dear as I did not know Tom Luten was going until last night and could not write until this morning and he is about getting off now. Now darling you must take all my pure and holy love for yourself for it is all yours now and forever.

William

You can get the chickens when Jennie goes back send a basket up with a piece of net over it to carry them in.

Source: William Henry Tripp and Araminta Guilford Tripp Papers, Southern Historical Collection, UNC Chapel Hill. http://www2.lib.unc.edu/mss/inv/t/Tripp,William_Henry_and_Araminta_Guilford.html#folder_7#2

Rocking Chair

Ladderback Rocking Chair with Woven Seat. North Carolina State Historic Sites.

Ladderback Rocking Chair with Woven Seat. North Carolina State Historic Sites.

Ladderback rocking chair with three shaped slats on back.  Woven rush seat, straight legs with turned finial at top.  Wide rockers.  Constructed about 1860.

 

Rocker Detail Ladderback Rocking Chair with Woven Seat. North Carolina State Historic Sites.

Rocker Detail Ladderback Rocking Chair with Woven Seat. North Carolina State Historic Sites.

Finial Detail. Ladderback Rocking Chair with Woven Seat. North Carolina State Historic Sites.

Finial Detail. Ladderback Rocking Chair with Woven Seat. North Carolina State Historic Sites.

Source: North Carolina State Historic Sites, accession number 1960.30.20.

Fort Holmes

October 1st [1864]

Dear Wife

I now will try to write you a note to let you know that I have arrived here safe and am quite well. My men were all seemingly very glad to see me. In fact they have hung around me so that I have not had the chance to write before. I was not feeling well yesterday being swollen in the stomach but it passed off at night. I had a right good time coming up to Wilson after I left home but had to steal corn out of a mans field to feed Tally that night. I settled up my board and other things in Wilmington on Tuesday and Wednesday and came down on Thursdays boat. There is a great deal of sickness here now and there has been all this fall. Lt. Whitely of Liggets company died last night of typohoid fever. He live just opposite us on the north side of the river and was an excellent young man. He was a large robust man and looked as if he was destined to an old age. His corpse just passed my house on its way home escorted by a company with muffled drums. Poor fellow: show will do him no good now. I pity his father and mother as they perhaps will receive the tidings of his death by having their sons corpse brought home to them. Not many of my company are sick now and what is sick are not dangerous at all. Whitely makes five I believe that have died here this week. Col. Lait seemed very glad to see me and our worthy Maj has not yet returned from his leave to express his joy at my safe return. The Col and I had some sharp sparring yesterday and both of us got quite warm. It began about Halsey and one thing led to another until I told him of his being saddled on us against the wish of all the officers. When he said he knew it and did not care a d_m if we did not like it. He told the truth no doubt. All concur in saying they never saw me so fat and looking so well before. I am feeling very well indeed but feel that I am fatning in the belly to fast. I have been faring quite well thus far as we get an abundance of fish. We have a seine hauled for the garrison and some of my men are on the detail and I make them bring me fish every day. Mars goes striking up the coast every night now and catches a great variety of as nice flounders as you ever saw and he brings them to me to take as many as I want every morning. I take one as that is enough for me and Macon as we are all that are here now. Harrison has not yet arrived and Col intends arresting him when he does come for staying over his time. HE sent me an order this morning to report him absent without leave from the 28th of Sept. There is a squall brewing for Harrison I fear. I am trying to avert it and hope I may succeed. Johnny was more pleased to see me than he would have been to see his father I reckon, and sticks close by me when off of duty. There is nothing stirring down here now, only the Yankees seem to have redoubled their vigilance and are catching steamers rapidly. They run one on shore and burned her night before last at Fisher. I have not yet learned which one it was but we think it was one bound out with a load of cotton. I had quite a load of things to bring down with me and I got them here all safe. I gave Eliza part of my dried apples and Mrs. Southerland a part. I also gave Mrs. Southerland part of my pepper and gave Col. Cunningham a part of the pepper also. Every one who tasted the catchup says it is excellent. I really wish I had two of three gallons of it it is so good. I find it is excellent with fish as it prevents thirst. I drew all of my rations up to the last of the month when I was in Wilmington and gave it to MRs. Southerland. It is unnecessary for me to say anything about Elizas family as Jenny went home with Billy. I persuaded her to do so as she has been confined so long at home and the change might do her baby good and I know you would be glad to see her. Hen she wishes to go back to Wilson you can get Billy to carry her and send Tom with them to carry her luggage in a cart. Perhaps John Bonner will let Charles go with her to help carry them up. I do not know that I have any directions to give you darling about anything as I told you and Roden all that I have wished done while at home. One thing tho I will say. Have the wheat got in as soon as you can as the great fault in my raising wheat has been getting it in too late. While I was at home in June I spoke to Mr. Watson on South Creek to save me some seed oats. Find out whether he done so and if he did when you go to sow oats get them and have them sowed too. Roden told me he had saved 6 bushels of oats and if you can get 4 bushels more to sow as they are the best find for homes we have have and saves corn. Tell Roden to do his best on the hogs and try and have them fattened well. Some one has stolen 4 of my pigs here only leaving me 4. I have a notion of selling what is left as I expect the same persons will take the balance of them. If [illeg] Tripp buys that koop for you or bargains for it you had better pay for him right off and take a receipt for the money. If Mr. Archbell will sell another one take it and I will try to send you the money to pay for it. I should like to buy all the big steers Mr. Archbell will sell another one take it and I will try to send you the money to pay for it. I should like to buy all the big steers Mr. Archbell has to spare at not over 125 dollars a piece. Their hides will almost pay for them at that price. I am anxiously looking for a letter from you and hope to hear that your bore our parting bravely. I hope also to hear of your being in good health and spirits and of the childrens being well. Poor Ben! I had to leave him sick but hope he has got well ere this. Tell the children when they learn the books I carried them I will get them more. Vene will learn hers sure for she seems very fond of books. Tell Josephus that he and Tom must go in the thicket and gather up the walnuts when they fall down. I saw that they were falling when I was at home. Sephe and Ben can with the little negroes get those in the field. Mars is very well indeed and so is Louis. I shall let Mars come home Christmas if nothing happens. Give my best respects to all the negroes and my love to all our dear little ones and tell Josephus and Vene to write to me. I want to be with you my own darling wife more than ever if possible. If I could be with you and stay with you, I could do a hep towards supporting the family by fishing and with my gun. By the John Walfinder promised me to buy me 4 or 6 lbs of net twine from Newberne. If he does you can have some small mesh nets tied. Excuse this rambling letter darling as I have so many around me it is hard to write at all and rest assured you are the dearest object to me on earth. I think of you all my moments of relaxations from my dutys. Good bye my own darling sweet little wife.

Yours forever and ever

William

Source: William Henry Tripp and Araminta Guilford Tripp Papers, Southern Historical Collection, UNC Chapel Hill. http://www2.lib.unc.edu/mss/inv/t/Tripp,William_Henry_and_Araminta_Guilford.html#folder_7#2

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