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$100 Reward

Ranaway from my Salt Works, Lockwood’s Folly, Brunswick County, about 25th February, my boy DAVE, 5 feet 10 inches high, 22 years of age; the ends of his two middle fingers off of his right hand; he is near copper color. No doubt he is lurking about Wilmington, as he was working around the wharves there for the blockade runners last week. I will pay the above reward for his confinement in jail so I can get him.

A.G. Thornton

 

Source: Fayetteville Observer, April 14, 1864 as found on www.ncecho.org

Second National Flag, headquarters flag for Major General Robert F. Hoke of Lincolnton, NC.  Hoke was wounded at the Battle of Chancellorsville in May 1863.  By April 1864 he was in command of forces who successfully re-captured Plymouth.  This flag has a white canvas staff edge with “Hoke” written on ink on it.  Machine sewn, appliqued stars.  The flag and other personal items were given to the Museum by Hoke before his death.

 

North Carolina Museum of History Collections, Accession Number 1914.89.8

Second National Confederate Flag, Headquarters flag of Major General Robert F. Hoke. NC Museum of History Collections

Second National Confederate Flag, Headquarters flag of Major General Robert F. Hoke. NC Museum of History Collections

Tuesday 12th April 1864

I made another gown for Gus today of old stuff. It will last while & such times as these we have to make everything count that will. Mr. Henry does not have to go to Asheville for a few days. He went to Asheville today. No further news from Laurel. I do wish we could once again have peace. We surely would do better that we did before this war but I fear that day is still far distant. God grant us peace I pray.

 

Wednesday 13th [April 1864]

I have done some mending today. Mr.s Fanning is here helping to spool a piece of cloth, mine & Matt’s dresses. ‘Tis one & one of pine bark dye & pale copperas. A crazey woman was here today named Rogers from Haywood Co. She has some sense, not much though. Mr. Henry at home today. I wish he could stay all the time.

Source: Diary of Cornelia Henry in Fear in North Carolina: The Civil War Journal and Letters of the Henry Family. Clinard, Karen L. and Russell, Richard, eds. (Asheville, NC: Reminiscing Books, 2008).

Sunday 10th [April 1864]

Wind from the North today. Cool. Peach blossoms getting out & the grass in the yard beginning to look green. Miss Ruth & Ellen Jones spent this day here. They are nice girls. Mr. Henry is asleep in my room. Willie & Zona at play. Matt, Ruth & Ellen out talking. My head feels unwell yet. I fear I shall have another attack. I am lean & feeble. Oh! that I could enjoy good health, I would be so thankful. We did not go to walk this evening. Matt & Zona went a piece with Ruth & Ellen. It was dark when they got back.

Source: Diary of Cornelia Henry in Fear in North Carolina: The Civil War Journal and Letters of the Henry Family. Clinard, Karen L. and Russell, Richard, eds. (Asheville, NC: Reminiscing Books, 2008).

Saturday 9th April 1864

I have suffered a great deal with my head in the past four days. I was in bed nearly all day Wednesday. Thursday it was a little better. I eat some dinner & I suffered a great deal that night. It was near 12 o’clock before I got to sleep. It really seemed my head would burst. Mrs. Snelson & husband spent the day here. Friday I was in bed nearly all day. Mr. Henry staid with me all day. He had a leather bottom put in the rocking chair yesterday for my comfort. He is the best husband in the world, so kind to me & my dear children. I hope I may life to raise them but I fear unless my health improves, I will have to leave them for some one else to raise. ‘Tis a sad thought to me. I feel much better today. Sat up all day & knit some & finished my gown I began last Tuesday. Mr. Henry went to Asheville today & all his detail. They go to Marshall on Monday. I hope Mr. Henry will not have to go. The tories have been robbing some down there again. The men lay around Allen’s house till Friday evening. Mr. Henry came home Wednesday when he heard I was sick. Rained all day yesterday. It seems we will not get much work done on the farm as ‘tis too wet to plough. They are still sowing oats. We have had a great deal of rain in the last two weeks.

Source: Diary of Cornelia Henry in Fear in North Carolina: The Civil War Journal and Letters of the Henry Family. Clinard, Karen L. and Russell, Richard, eds. (Asheville, NC: Reminiscing Books, 2008).

[Cornelia Henry to her son Pinck]

My Dear little Pinck,

The mail will soon be on but I will write a little as Papa left this for me. Papa has told you all about the big snow. Atheline’s baby is growing finely, about as big as a rabbit. She asks about you a heap of times. Let me tell you something. Gus can walk all over the house & not fall & when he does fall he can get up hisself. See I told you he would walk before you came home. He can say Papa right plain. He will run & meet you at the gate when you come & call you Pinck. Now see if he don’t. He has got to fighting of late. He pulls Rose’s wool good for her when she don’t please him.

Zona has grown a good deal since you left. She spells her lesson every day & Willie wants to spell too. They often speak of you & want to see Pinck come home. You must learn fast so you can read your paper when you come.

Tell Aunt Dora to send me the measure of your head. I want to have  you a straw hat made by the time you come & tell her to send the measure of your foot to have you some shoes made to travel home in. I am afraid Mother can’t come after you as Papa can’t stay at home & if we all leave the soldiers and deserters will steal all we got. We will send after next month I think. I would like to come so much but can’t this time. Be a good boy.

Mother has been sick for a month but I am a good deal better now. I have not weaned Gus yet. Papa wants me to wean him. I am so lean. Love Aunt Dora & Aunt Matt. They are your Mother’s sister just like Zona is your sister. Be kind to them. They will love you for you are a good boy. Mother & Papa love you dearly. Knit me something & send in a letter so I can show it to Zona & Willie. Good bye. God bless you my dear child.

Your fond Mother

Zona, Willie & Gus send kisses to Pinck, Aunt Dora & Matt. Dora give my love to Pa. It seems he cares nothing for me.

 

Source: Diary of Cornelia Henry in Fear in North Carolina: The Civil War Journal and Letters of the Henry Family. Clinard, Karen L. and Russell, Richard, eds. (Asheville, NC: Reminiscing Books, 2008).

The 12th the 3d Maryland Negro Regiment was plaisd on gard around the Prison Camp. When the Negrows first come on gard they wore thir knapsacks and when they was put on poast they puled them off and laid them down at the end of thir lines  And some of our men stole too of them: And when the Negro found it was gone he sais to the next one on post Efrum-Efrum: tell that other Negrow up dar that the white folks has stold my knapsack a redy: The other one sais they have stold mine too but I want caring for the knapsack all I hate about it is loosing Sophys Garotipe. One day too of them was on poast in the Streets and met up at the end of thir lines and commenced fooling with thir Guns what they cauld plaing bayonets they had their guns cocked presently one of thir guns went of and shot the other one threw the brest  he fell dead: the other one sais: Jim, Jim get up from dar you are not hurt your just trying to fool me.

 

Source: Christopher Watford, ed. The Civil War in North Carolina: Soldiers’ and Civilians’ Letters and Diaries, 1861-1865, Volume 1. Diary of Sgt. Bartlett Yancey Malone.

. When the Negrows first come on gard they wore thir knapsacks and when they was put on poast they puled them off and laid them down at the end of thir lines  And some of our men stole too of them: And when the Negro found it was gone he sais to the next one on post Efrum-Efrum: tell that other Negrow up dar that the white folks has stold my knapsack a redy: The other one sais they have stold mine too but I want caring for the knapsack all I hate about it is loosing Sophys Garotipe. One day too of them was on poast in the Streets and met up at the end of thir lines and commenced fooling with thir Guns what they cauld plaing bayonets they had their guns cocked presently one of thir guns went of and shot the other one threw the brest  he fell dead: the other one sais: Jim, Jim get up from dar you are not hurt your just trying to fool me.

 

Source: Christopher Watford, ed. The Civil War in North Carolina: Soldiers’ and Civilians’ Letters and Diaries, 1861-1865, Volume 1. Diary of Sgt. Bartlett Yancey Malone.

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