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Posts Tagged ‘Daniel Larned’

Monday 3rd [1862]

We pulled and pushed last night till 9 ½ when our boat swung clear, and we run up to our fleet arriving home a bout 12 ½ — was very dark, and as we came up through the woods, we stumbled over the body of a man – a guard came up, and we found it was a member of the 11th Conn – dead drunk; a few feet farther on lay another one in the same condition. The General (Burnside) ordered the guard to take them home & put them in the guard house – this morning when they found they had been picked up by the General they were frightened half to death – We have had some of the funniest instances of promptness, and again of greenness with our guards. We have a strong guard round the house, and one of them Stands in the Entry, and sees to the fires, up stairs & down – the other night the General & myself was up writing about two oclock. He “was took” & went out – the Sentinel did not see him as he passed out, but when he started to Come in he found a bayonet pointed at him, with “who comes there.” “The General in Chief” was the reply. “Advance General & give the Countersign” but as the General had not the magic word with him, he had to stand in his dressing gown, Slippers & drawers, till he could call the Corporal & get passed. He came in laughing ready to kill himself over it – Mr French was passing the guard one evening, when the guard cried, Halt! – “Well” says Mr F. “Halt” says the guard – “well what next” says French – I am going to say Halt once more & then Shoot” was the reply. The ignorant fellow was taken to the Sergeant & instructed in his duties – This morning was calm & warm, but so foggy you could not see the harbor at all – it has been all kinds of weather during the day and now it is blowing a gale – The Commodore came on shore this morning with Capt Case the Capt of the fleet, and took a long ride on horseback – and dined with us – we had Turtle soup, and I never eat a better one – Pate de Poisson, broiled flat fish – Roast goose, grouse – duck – boiled Ham – Corn, tomatoes, beets, potatoes, macaronie – sweet potatoe pudding – apple fritters champagne & sherry – the cooking was very good, but it has taken a deal of scolding to make the Cook do his work properly – This evening I went into one of the tents & begun to hum “Old John Brown” some one joined me, then another & we got to singing & some 6 of us have been singing all the evening till I am perfectly hoarse it is the first sing I have had since we left home –

Source: Daniel Larned Papers, Library of Congress, Transcribed from original by John Barden for Tryon Palace Historic Site & Gardens

*** Daniel Larned was General Burnside’s Private Secretary for most of the Civil War

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Sunday Mch 2d – 4 PM

Now we are hard & fast aground down in “Pamlico Sound” We left at 12 to go round to Oregon Inlet to see what the “lay of the land” was but a fog came on & we struck a little breech just outside the Inlet, and have been swinging round to two hours – the prospect is good for a night of it – so much for Sundays work, but it was necessary to see and test the channel before sending a vessel through which we hoped to do tomorrow – We have on board 4 Brigadier Genl & naval Comander 2 naval Capt & 1 navy Surgeon – besides our our  Brigade Surgeon on board.  By the way how would you like a Brigadier Genl for a permanent beau – Brig Gnl Parker is a splendid fellow – a bachelor & quite a catch – how I wish I was home & in church to day instead of here.  There is no Sunday here, no difference from the rest of the week, though the General has ordered that no unnecessary work be done – on the Sabbath, but all work seems to be necessary in order to hasten our expedition. I found a little book in the ½  barrel with Aunts writing on the fly leaf. I love to come across the little books – by the way – I wish you would copy that hymn from the “Hymns of the Ages” that contains a prayer – I showed it to you, & snatches of it come up to me very often, but I cant recall the whole of it.

Source: Daniel Larned Papers, Library of Congress, Transcribed from original by John Barden for Tryon Palace Historic Site & Gardens

*** Daniel Larned was General Burnside’s Private Secretary for most of the Civil War

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March 1st [1862] (continued from an earlier letter to family in NY)

The month has come in like a Lion; it blows very hard. The white capes are all over the Sound, and the waves very high, but the sun is clear & bright – it is one of Roanoke’s Winter days – Last evening about 7 ½ the General handed me a note & Said: “ Mr Larned can you get that on board the Commodore’s vessel & bring me an answer to night” – I promptly replied “Yes Sir” – but how to do it I did not know – it was dark and blowing hard – but out I went – the Flag Ship lay some 3 miles down the harbor. I went down to the wharf out to the end. Some 500 feet from the Shore & Shouted “Phoenix  a hoy” till I was hoarse. (the Generals boat & crew was on the Phoenix) but no reply; no one could see me, neither could I see the boats any where – at last I got a “cunner” or canoe & pushed off to the Phoenix got the boat & went down, delivered my message & back safely. The Generals “Thank you Mr Larned I am very much obliged to you” was ample reward – we have been for several days trying to go round to “Oregon Inlet, “ but the wind is too fresh, to accomplish anything if we went – Your letters 18th with that of Ed Townsend came safely to hand day before yesterday – letters from Providence say my letters are in great demand – I have written Mrs. Burnside that if my letters become general I can not write freely – but you must not show my journal, save to family friends – I am glad to have Mr Fellows and Mr Nicholson see them, because it interests them for the time, and will make no lasting impression like Rosalie [Starrs] books — but I can’t bear to have them read & criticized.  While I write a “rebel” is talking with the General, not a rebel but a native – and such queer talk I never heard.  “tuk” for took “Coona” for couldn’t “right smart” for great deal &c. A man came to me the second time inquiring for some person & says “Well Sir I never knowed him no more arter you showed him to me agin” The other day I took some papers out to some contrabands, and said I to the mother of some dozen little nigs “can you read at all” – “Why bress de Lor Massa, I dun no B. from Bulls feet; I’se wish to God I did”  About ten o’clock this morning, Mr French and I went out ot walk, we went into the woods, and though the wind was blowing very fresh here at the house, there the sun came down as warm as July – we passed several houses, and talked with the people – they are all ignorant persons, and the children look like crazy beings – no [manners] ragged, uncombed & dirty.  The houses are all poor, but large – nothing but clapboards & shingles – if I can I will draw a plan of this house which is a fair sample of all – the best place I have seen yet, and one that comes the nearest to civilization was in the middle of the woods. It was a two story house, two room on each floor, & no walls or lathing – only the rough beams – every window had over half of the panes broken out. A man with three children lived there. There were the strangest looking beings I ever saw – I tried to talk with them, but they giggled & ran away – I saw two or three doves – some poor cattle, but the whole places looked like Israel [Ellis] fine house in its worst states of decay – Yet this man is considered a rich man. Evening I have been looking over that book “John” or “is a Cousin the hand” & c., how many recollections it brings up -on one page is written in H.D.W.’s hand “April 5 1854 Daniel” who thought that would come out to North Carolina

Source: Daniel Larned Papers, Library of Congress, Transcribed from original by John Barden for Tryon Palace Historic Site & Gardens

*** Daniel Larned was General Burnside’s Private Secretary for most of the Civil War

 

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26 Wednesday [February 26] PM

Hurrah! For the General. He’s a bully boy – We had two of the Navy to dine to day – and they got to discussing war & politics; and the General came out top of the heap – because he had the right on his side – Commander Rowan is for a monarchy, don’t believe the Government can ever be reunited on it presents basis. Capt Case think it will. The General don’t think at all, he knows it   it is what he is fighting for, and what he will fight for to the end – he believes we are in the right, and that an overruling Providence guides the whole affair—“Bully for him” – This morning while we were waiting on the dock for news from the fleet that had been sent to Hatteras to bring up the remainder of our forces, a boat load of boxes, barrels, trunks & c came up along side; as one of the men approached the General I thought he looked like someone I had seen. They proved to be a committee from the Sanitary Commission – with delicacies for the sick & wounded – I noticed the name of “Woolsey” on the Trunk, a lady’s trunk – think I now here comes “Sarah Woolsey” – I went off with the General & thought no more of it, till late in the evening, while I was looking around the camp, I went into their tent & after alking with them, discovered one of the two was a Mr Woolsey, who had come out on his own account, and from pure love & Sympathy for the unfortunate. He is a son of Rev Charles Woolsey & own cousin to Annie & the Wooster St Woolseys, & to the Winthrops – We sat down & talked over our friends; and I hope to find in these two rather more congenial Spirits than in the rest of our company. They are from the Young Mens Christain ass. — & Dr. Tyngs church – We made them very comfortable & they seemed to be surprised to find they were to receive any attention – The General delights in aiding any work of the kind – Yesterday he gave orders for a building to be put up at “Fort Reno” or Camp Burnside,” where all the Contrabands could assemble and be taught by the Chaplains & such of the Soldiers as Should choose to volunteer their Services – There is a Mr. [illeg] on Genl Parkes Staff, a cousin of the [Redmans] of Orange, & ho I think I have seen with them: he is a very pleasant, Gentlemanly fellow, and as I have not yet heard him swear, I hope to cultivate him still more. We have walked & strolled around together a good deal, & I hope he will prove a good fellow –

Source: Daniel Larned Papers, Library of Congress, Transcribed from original by John Barden for Tryon Palace Historic Site & Gardens

*** Daniel Larned was General Burnside’s Private Secretary for most of the Civil War

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Tuesday 25 [February] 1862

This morning the breeze was so fresh that we could not do much in small boats so I took a stroll all alone up to the Camp of the 14 Mass – and then to the upper Fort, named “Fort Reno.” Coming home on the beach the sun was warm & delightful; and I enjoyed being alone By the time I reached home my half barrel had come on shore and I proceeded at once to unpack it – the people came around me as thick as bees: (you can no more find a spot where you may be alone than in a hive of bees) I called the Sentry & told him not to allow one person to come within Six feet of the barrel – he did his duty well, and the contents were at last “noticed” – how good they all looked so homelike & clean – I anticipate a sweet sleep on the hair pillow to night I have been crowing over the others because I have such a nice rubber pillow the General and myself are the only possessors of the article – but I shall exchange for a clean white pillow case to night & say nothing – The slippers will be very nice in case of sickness – but would to answer to use where the dirt is shoveled out rather than swept.  What did you send that “John” for, it is so associated with Mary Vail, M.W. & H.D.W. I shall not give it up for general reading We had the [nasturtiums] for dinner to day, and one dish of Grouse smothered and two Roast – also the butter was opened and was very fine – I shall put the ginger snaps on for tea – We dine at 3. and at 7. have coffee & plain crackers. I shall save one pack for private use & distribute the rest of the snaps, they are very nice & fresh – I shall write the others about the several articles. I have been riding with MR. French this afternoon some 6 or 7 miles – across the Island & down past the battery that we took – how much I shall have to tell when I come home – Our orderly (Zouave)  is a comical fellow, and a great favorite with all. He met us on the road & joined us in our ride. The General has given him a horse to use – and he is perfectly happy


Source: Daniel Larned Papers, Library of Congress, Transcribed from original by John Barden for Tryon Palace Historic Site & Gardens

*** Daniel Larned was General Burnside’s Private Secretary for most of the Civil War

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Monday Feb 24 1862

 

Dear Sister – After dispatching our mails yesterday at 2 pm. I went out to walk and laid round loose, generally – as the general said I had done enough for one while. During the evening I was lying down listening to the conversation of the 3 Brigadiers, when one of our Staff came in from Hatteras Inlet, bringing word that the wail was below, but would not be up till morning; he had scarcely said the words when Capt Loring made his appearance – fresh from N. York. Of course all was hullabaloo, in a moment, he handed me the Staff letters, and I distributed them putting Several in my own pocket, he also brought several late papers – and the excitement grew more & more intense every moment, as one after the other read item after item of news, confirming reports that we had previously heard, but did not credit – When is was announced that Genls Pillow Johnson & Buckner were among the Prisoners taken, Such a yell from all in the room I never heard – it almost equaled the yell of the Zouaves at the taking of the Battery on the 8th.  Buckner was an old friend & business associate of Genl Burnside’s, and he has often spoken of “Simon” – This morning I took a boat & went on board our Steamer, the “Alice Price” & ran down to the “E.S. Terry” Some two miles down the harbor, & got the Express matter & private Stores; when I saw my name with the familiar writing of Uncle & Henry, I said – “That is my property.’   “is this Mr. Larned” said one of the clerks. I replied in the affirmative. “We have a great many packages for you Sir” and began to hand out “great box, little box, band box & bundle” I have decided that you intend to make me distributing missionary which office I respectfully [!] decline – The mail & most of the packages were brought on shore, and if you could see the gay & happiness in our old hut to day – it would compensate you for all the trouble you have been at in forwarding these things – every one says –
how many letters did you get” and each one gluts over his own – the wind is blowing a perfect hurricane, so that we can do nothing in the harbor & the day is given up to reading the papers & letters from home – every bed and there are six in the room is covered with the papers & bundles & the floor is strewed, all read aloud at a time.  The General receives long letters from his wife, and the big tears drop as he reads them; he also received her photograph, I wish others were as thoughtful.**  My ½ barrel is on the “Alice Price” and I shall go on board & open it as soon as it calms down, also the bundle of reading matter – the Sack containing books & c with a box of cigars, was brought on shore and opened. I am a thousand times obliged for all. When I announced the contribution to the private stores—I was cheered, patted on the back, & almost lifted on the Shoulders. I told the General quietly first & he was delighted & expresses many thanks I am in good favor with them all but this makes them think I am “some pumpkins” – I will defer all thanks till I open the other boxes & then do it all in a heap –

 

Source: Daniel Larned Papers, Library of Congress, Transcribed from original by John Barden for Tryon Palace Historic Site & Gardens

**General Burnside

*** Daniel Larned was General Burnside’s Private Secretary for most of the Civil War

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Roanoke Island

Feb 12 1862

My dear Sister

 

I wish you could see me just now – it is a clear warm day, so that thick clothes are rather burdensome. I am up at headquarters a two story house with a rough partition dividing the house in two rooms – upstairs it is all one room – no lathing or upper floor, only the shingles over head – we have two cot beds in the rooms & 3 chairs – 6 windows, and a ladder to get up & down.  We have 4 prisoners in the room, and two or three of us are obliged to be with them all the time – they are all officers & very pleasant gentlemanly men—they are rather sad, but behave themselves very well they have been writing home & we read their letters, & if there is nothing Contraband in them, we promise to mail them at Old Point – two of them were not in action but came on with reinforcements & were nabbed as they landed – it is funny to feel that I am watching the Secesh, but they are no trouble yet – as we guard them to closely – yet give them every attention we can. The Spaulding goes home to day or tomorrow, with prisoners & a mail. A flag of truce came down yesterday for [illeg] today of [illeg] & the wounded – the boat lies out in the harbor & we cant help laughing at the whole appearance of the thing – She is the feeblest piece of waterworks I ever saw — & the secesh flag looks more like a rag than anything I ever saw – several officers have found old acquaintances in the prisoners & the meeting has been sometimes very sad & sometimes very funny – the General saw a fellow looking at him & in a few minutes he came forward & says “Will General Burnside allow an old acquaintance to speak a few words to him.”  The General shook him heartily by the hand with “Good Heavens, Jim, how came you here” – it was an old crony, that he had not met for years — & did not know of his Secesh principles – As I came up this morning I saw an old lady standing among the crowd in the Yards – She was dressed in a black quilted hood a short cloak & a black dress & white stockings – didn’t know what hoops were – I went up & spoke with her – she said she wasn’t nothing but a wider – had come over from Nags head, cause she didn’t like to be left all alone there, & if she could get a pass should go back all right – I asked her if she was for the Union or Secesh – “Well I never studied much & I don’t know what I am – I never knew much about it – only I am a widow my husband died &c &c” – Several have come in this morning & voluntarily taken the oath of allegiance – I am writing this on top of a cigar box, and watching all the time too; Shall send [illeg] it by a Mr. Vizzitelli – to whom I have given a note to Henry – and have asked Mr Vizzitelli to call on him – Mr V- has been a very pleasant friend to me, but decidedly English. The vessel that will take [illeg] prisoners will probably return — & if you see Mr. V – he will tell you all about it – The Dr tells me that the number of our killed is 32 & the wounded a little over 200 – the rebels lose about 15 killed & 60 wounded –

 

Feb 13th Thursday [1862]

Your letter of the 1st is just received by an arrival fr Fort Monroe and you will get news of our victory tomorrow – if you make such a fuss over Tennessee what will you do over our success – I am too tired to write to night – I have been writing constantly since 1 o’clock this [illeg] it is now 7 PM & have got more to do this eve. My next shall answer your letter more fully. The dispatches as they are printed look very natural to me – as I write every word of it.  My report to day is 3 full foolscap sheets – tell me what you think of it – I shall write you all together as I suppose Amelia is with you now – the3 last few days have been splendid – we have windows open till late at night – how much I think of you all & look forward to seeing sometime again – I will write you fully by next mail & hope to hear from you often – good night – aff yrs

Dan

Source: Daniel Larned Papers, Library of Congress, Transcribed from original by John Darden for Tryon Palace Historic Site & Gardens

*** Daniel Larned was General Burnside’s Private Secretary for most of the Civil War

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