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Posts Tagged ‘furlough’

Tuesday 26th [July 1864]

I have been quite unwell all day, a dull headache. Mr. Henry went to town since dinner.l We had eat supper when he got home. He got a furlough for ten days. I am so sorry he has to go out again. I do hope no ill will befall him. I have done nothing but knit today. Matt finished a shirt for Sam today, began it yesterday.

Source: Diary of Cornelia Henry in Fear in North Carolina: The Civil War Journal and Letters of the Henry Family. Clinard, Karen L. and Russell, Richard, eds. (Asheville, NC: Reminiscing Books, 2008).

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Sunday July 24th 1864

Very cool this morning. I had the pines taken out the fire places & fire this morning. Mr. Henry has gone to see Capt. Jones to try & stay at home to save his oats. Mary Tutt is here. Her & Matt go to church this evening at the Academy at 2 o’clock. Dr. Cummins preaches. Dinner will soon be in. We have our first cucumbers today. We have had apple dumplings several times. I sent Lonzo to Sister Jane’s yesterday with a basket of apples. They are getting ripe (the June apples). Mr. Henry did not get home till nearly sundown. He will go to town in a day or two to get his leave of absence. We did not go to walk this evening as Mr. Henry was tired.

Source: Diary of Cornelia Henry in Fear in North Carolina: The Civil War Journal and Letters of the Henry Family. Clinard, Karen L. and Russell, Richard, eds. (Asheville, NC: Reminiscing Books, 2008).

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Camp near Orange CH Va

April 16, 1864

My dearest Corrie:

After along time your first came to hand last evening, which was gladly received and read as in days past. I can assure you it gave me more of a contented mind, the name at the end if no name on paper always looks charming to the one of your choice. Through a note from Capt. Parks at Richmond gave us the pleasing intelligence that Father had to a great extent recovered from his illness; we first heard through a letter to Logan he was very sick, which caused great uneasiness as I very much fear at some time on of those sudden attacks will take him away, for the last few months he has had several as you are aware. I staid with Mat the night after I left home, arrived at Richmond Saturday morning, went to the Hospital where brother died and found on the books his death recorded 28th Dec., I inquired where his remains rested, was told at Oakwood Cemetery 2 ½ miles distant as I had business to attend I did not go out. I was told that he was neatly buried in a raised lid coffin and that the grave was marked. I asked if his remains could be easily removed which was replied to in the affirmative, said if I could see him I would recognize him as the body by that time had not decayed any. I wrote to father to send someone after them, I don’t know what he concluded to do as I haven’t had an answer.

I tried to get brother’s effects but could not as the proper heir has to make oath before a magistrate that he is such then have the County Court clerk’s signature and seal before anything can be obtained; after he fills the blank I sent him, and gives me a power of attorney, with both I can get his effects and money due, otherwise I cannot.

Have you subscribed for the Confederate? If you have not let me know and I will send it to you. Do you get the Presbyterian? I subscribed for it. Do you and Puss want either of the Richmond literary papers? Our regiment is in good health and spirits. There is no possible chance for me to get a furlough this spring as Walker has been trying to get off ever since I came back. Genl. Lee’s order is “there will be no more furloughs as the exigencies of the times will not admit of it.”  Tom, Bill, Pinck, Log and all of our boys are in good health. Give my love to all.

Write soon and often to

Your devoted

Lewis

 

Sources: Mike and Carol Lawing, eds., My Dearest Friend: The Civil War Correspondence of Cornelia McGimsey and Lewis Warlick (Durham, NC: Carolina Academic Press, 2000). Original collections of the papers are in the Southern Historical Collection, UNC Chapel Hill.

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Camp 11th NC near Orange CH, VA

April 11, 1864

 

My dearest Friend,

Every evening I’m disappointed in not getting any letters, not one have I received yet and this being the fifth I have written you since my return, surely my first did not reach you. I will wait as patiently as possible for the welcome message. Recently by an underground passage I have ascertained that Puss has a new correspondent in the 11th, doubtless the trip to Raleigh was not altogether spent in idle chit chat, but the conversation turned on a more serious affair, perhaps on love matters – don’t know only guessing at any rate you must tease Puss about it. I’ll lay a wager that you will never see the contents of the missive she will get about the time or a few days previous of your getting this.

I’m not a prophet nor the son of a prophet but sometimes my predictions turn out even so.

We are looking for marching orders every day as orders have been issued for all baggage, supplies baggage, with all visitors to be sent to the rear; the general impression is that Lee is going to Culpepper as hurriedly as possible after starting, to pounce down on Grants right flank while he is reorganizing his army and give him battle before he will be able to concentrate his troops; thereby breaking and confusing his plans for an onward movement to Richmond. I think it altogether probable, if this should be the plan, that we will be able to drive the enemy in his strong holds around Centerville before he will be able to give us battle with his whole force. I think it very likely the inclemency of the weather will postpone active operations a few days for it has rained nearly every day for a week. Morgan starts home tomorrow by him I send the “raids,” to be left at Mr. Duval’s – think you will be mighty pleased with it, especially with the characters, “Lu” “Mary” & “Evangeline,” they were great heroines. I haven’t read “No Name” yet – will send it ito you the first opportunity after I shall have read it.

I would like very much to go home on furlough this Spring but that is impossible for an order from Genl. Lee has put an end to them. You told me before I left home there was some things you needed and wanted me to get in Richmond, but when I left I never thought a word about it, write me what you want and I will try and get them and send to you. The boys are generally well but badly clothed, we have had a requisition out for some time for clothing, not yet have we been able to get them and I don’t see why it is as there is plenty in NC for the troops and now is the time the soldiers ought to have them as an active campaign is right on hand. Tuesday Morning  This morning  we have nothing but corn bread for breakfast, we ought have drawn last evening, we draw the same amount of rations as the men free of charge and buying for the commissary is entirely cut of from the officers, all fare alike from private to Genl.

When I draw I will send you some money if an opportunity affords and I would like if you can, by some cotton yarn to make me some shirts   would rather have small checks for I see no change of getting from the Government. My kindest regards to all. As ever your devoted husband.

Sources: Mike and Carol Lawing, eds., My Dearest Friend: The Civil War Correspondence of Cornelia McGimsey and Lewis Warlick (Durham, NC: Carolina Academic Press, 2000). Original collections of the papers are in the Southern Historical Collection, UNC Chapel Hill.

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Camp near Orange Courthouse

April the 5 1864

Dear wife

I this morning take the present opportunity to drop you a few lines to let you know that I am well and truly hope these few lines may find you all well. Dear wife, I received your letter the other day and was glad to hear from you to hear that you was well. I want you to write and tell me whether Brother Daniel got home safe or not. We had a very deep snow here some time ago, and we have had several little snows since then, and we have a rainy time of it now. We have had a very bad weather ever since I came back from the hospital to the company. I am glad to hear that you was a getting along with your work as well as you are. Whenever you get a chance to have the baby’s funeral preached, you might better have it soon, for a chance of me a getting a furlough now is very dull. I want you to let me know whether you got the plank hauled up from the sawmills yet or not. Brother Noah said that he thought he could work some at the porch for you if he gets home. I want you to let me know whether you heard that he got home safe yet or not.

That box you started to send me, everything that was in it got lost. The regiment that I was in got the box or a part of it, and they eat it up and now denies it that they ever got it. The people are not to be trusted these days for I had a shirt stole out of my knapsack. It was the one that you sent with your Uncle Kenery.

I want Daniel as soon as he can to write to me and tell me how all the folks is getting along. I want you to tell Daniel that he should go and see Brother Ephraim and tell him that I would like for him to do my blacksmithing this summer for me. And tell him to write to me and tell me how he will charge for his work, whether he will charge high or not.

I want you in your next letter to write and tell me whether you will have enough meat to do you or not. I would like to be there at home to get some of your sweet potatoes, and I want you to write and tell me whether you have money or not. I want you to tell me whether you got enough for to do you. Dear wife, I have not much news to write that will interest you much, so I will bring my letter to a close by asking you to write to me as soon as you get this letter, so I will close by asking you to write soon. So, no more, only remain your husband until death.

Andrew Rink to Emeline Rink

 

Source: Christopher Watford, ed. The Civil War in North Carolina: Soldiers’ and Civilians’ Letters and Diaries, 1861-1865, Volume 1.

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Camp 49th NC Troops

March 20th 1864

Kind and Affectionate Wife

I have just eat dinner. We had some good Bread, fryed Bacon and Onions. The Government issues Rations to the officers now but they will not sell us any. I like the law very well except when any of our friends comes to see us they must bring their own rations.

The company declares they can not give me up to be the sheriff. They say they will all vote for me if I only will stay with them. They seem very much disturbed about me leaving than I am expecting to leave. Orderly Sergeant Bridges, G. Russell, and several others say that if I leave the company is gone up the spout. They say that Weaver will not do for Captain and Ben is too young etc.

I understand that General Lee has started granting furloughs. We may luck out and get some furloughs before the summer’s campaigns begin. Write to me if your school has commenced and tell me how Johnny is doing and if he is a good boy and Kassey if she gives such sweet little kisses still.

Your true husband

C.H.Dixon

 

Source: Christopher Watford, ed. The Civil War in North Carolina: Soldiers’ and Civilians’ Letters and Diaries, 1861-1865, Volume 1. Original in the C.H. Dixon papers, Duke University Special Collections Library.

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March 22nd [1864]

We have had a heavy fall of snow today and it is now a pitiless storm. The wind howling & sleet & snow still falling. The Col has just measured the depth of snow & it is seven inches deep. We have a weather-bound soldier with us. Has been detained two days & nights already. Sandie Elliot came in the evening to bid us good-bye and will be “off for the war’s again,” as soon as the weather will allow him to travel. He is a dear affectionate relative & I trust he will be spared to us when the “cruel war is over.”

Henry has been busy today catching birds & the little girls amused themselves cooking them. What a sight for the poor, for soldiers, & dear sailors! Oh how thankful should we be for our comfortable home & warm beds!

God pity the poor!

 

Source: Jane Evans Elliot Diaries #5343, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. http://www.lib.unc.edu/mss/inv/e/Elliot,Jane_Evans.html

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Friday March 3d [1864]

Cousin William left today in the carriage for camp. It has been a very long day to me. We miss him almost as much as we do Buddy. He is so lively.

 

 

Source: Malinda Ray Diary, Anna Sutton Sherman Papers, North Carolina State Archives.  See also David A. Ray Papers, Southern Historical Collection, UNC-Chapel Hill

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Saturday 13th Feb. [1864]

Pa succeeded in getting Buddy temporarily transferred for duty in this state. Col Mallett gave him a furlough of ten days after which he was ordered to report at Statesville. He arrived here Friday afternoon the sixteenth on the stage. Cousin William arrived the evening after from Cheraw. I have no seen him before in ten years. He has changed a good deal, looks mighty old. We spent a delightful week. Buddy left yesterday afternoon. His visit seems like a dream. “A green spot in memory’s waste.” Cousin William is still here. We see a great deal of him.

 

** Buddy is Malinda’s brother

Source: Malinda Ray Diary, Anna Sutton Sherman Papers, North Carolina State Archives.  See also David A. Ray Papers, Southern Historical Collection, UNC-Chapel Hill

 

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Wednesday Jan 27th [1864]

Mr Stuart came down on the train Monday afternoon & stayed with us till this morning he returned home for the train & took Cousin Jane Murchison with him. Sister went out to the Pearce’s Monday &  came home this afternoon. I went home with Emily yesterday afternoon & came home this afternoon. William Anderson arrived home on Furlough Saturday, 23rd January.

Source: Malinda Ray Diary, Anna Sutton Sherman Papers, North CarolinaState Archives.  See also David A. Ray Papers, Southern Historical Collection, UNC-Chapel Hill

 

 

 

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