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Archive for the ‘Malinda Ray’ Category

August 9th [1864]

Mrs. Charley Cook died Aug. 5th. She leaves three children, one infant of a few weeks. Her funeral took place from the Methodist church Sunday morning. Marion Jones Sandford died Sunday 7th. She was buried yesterday afternoon. Her death was a great shock to the community a great grief to her mother. She was only sick a week or two with typhoid fever. Aged 19. She had been sick for several weeks. Tommy Hubert died Sept 16th at Smithville. He was with the 17 year old boys – the Junior Reserves. His mother was with him during his illness and brought his body home.

 

 

Source: Malinda Ray Diary, Southern Historical Collection, UNC Chapel Hill.

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August 4th [1864]

This is the day of electing our Governor. No one has any doubt of Gov. Vance’s election but everybody is anxious for him to leave that miserable traitor the self made candidate WW Holden behind. Holden received 3 % of the votes here. I am extremely anxious to hear from Buddy. The deserters announced their intention of returning to Yadkinville and controlling the polls. And I am afraid it will be a stormy day. I wish Holden could be choked.

Source: Malinda Ray Diary, Southern Historical Collection, UNC Chapel Hill

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August 2, 1864

We moved out in the country last week. It is mighty pleasant out here but hated to leave Cousin Sally & all of them there right badly; but I hope they will spend a good deal of time with us. Miss Bena went to her own home when we moved out here. She was getting a great deal stronger & better but she was taken sick on going home & has been quite sick ever since. Benny Robinson got home last Saturday week 24th July. He is very lame & uses both crutches. I think he will probably always be lame. Neill Ray is here in the hospital. He lost his foot in one of the fights before Richmond. He seems to be getting on as comfortably as possible under the circumstances, but he is not well enough to go to his home which would be to far in the country to receive proper medical attention. Buddy is still in Yadkin county. That part of the state is in a dreadful condition. It is filled with tories deserters. They rendezvous in Tennessee, near the border and the 4th of July sixty of them entered Yadkinville at night and demanded the keys of the jail; the jailer delivered them up and they released four deserters who were confined for the murder of two respectable loyal citizens. Then they fired on the Village and left it. After that they visited the house of the Capt. of the Home Guards made him surrender his arms. The 18th of July the Home Guard and these deserters met at the Quaker meeting school house & were engaged in a fight two men were killed on either side. They swear they will take Buddy & carry him to Tennessee. They have an special spite at him because he is an officer.

 

Source: Malinda Ray Diary, Southern Historical Collection, UNC Chapel Hill.

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May 20th [1864]
I am afraid I was rather hasty in my conclusion that peace was so near. For the Yankees seem determined to remain blind and deaf to the fact that we will never give up; & a good whipping only makes them go to work with renewed vigor. We have every success and their defeat.
Source: Malinda Ray Diary, Anna Sutton Sherman Papers, North Carolina State Archives. See also David A. Ray Papers, Southern Historical Collection, UNC-Chapel Hill

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Summary of April, early May 1864

Cousin William left here Saturday 14 [April 1864]. He had been here a little more than two weeks. His health was so bad when he returned to the army after his visit in the winter that when the preparations for the Spring campaign began the surgeon ordered him to the rear. His sister, Mrs. Malloy is very ill out a Gillopis & he has gone out there with her. Thus far this has been a glorious campaign for us. Everybody seems confident of success & though all those who have loved ones in the field are enduring the most intense mental suffering & anxiety yet the people as a body can rejoice with all their hearts. Washington & Plymouth NC have been recaptured by our forces under Gen Hoke & although the Yankees burnt almost the whole of Washington still the people and the surrounding country are freed from Yankee rule and then the productions of that fertile part of the state will be such a help to us. If all we hear from our armies is true it is such a victory as not country ever witnessed and the brightest day our confederacy ever saw & peace must be near.

 

 

 

Source: Malinda Ray Diary, Anna Sutton Sherman Papers, North Carolina State Archives.  See also David A. Ray Papers, Southern Historical Collection, UNC-Chapel Hill

 

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Gov Vance spoke here Friday morning April 22d. He arrived Thursday evening about 8 o’clock having traveled through the country in his buggy. The Mayor and committee of Arrangements met him near the limits of the town & escorted him to the Fayetteville Hotel where a large crowd had gathered who welcomed him with cheers. The Mayor made a little speech welcoming him to our town in the name of the citizens to which he responded briefly and excused himself on the plea of fatigue having spoken that day two or three hours in Harnett.

Friday was a holiday in our town reminding us a little of the good old times before the war. All business was suspended and crowds of ladies & gentlemen from our own & the neighboring counties thronged the streets. At 11 ½ the Governor appeared upon the stand & was introduced to about 3000 people by the Hon TC Fuller. The ladies stood in the windows and balconies of the neighboring houses or were provided with seats in the street. The masculine, Mr. Hale says, stood without weariness during the three following hours of intellectual entertainment. The lion of the day was a much younger man than I had expected to see: he appeared to be about six feet high; his hair was black & long brushed behind his ears, his eyes were dark grey sparkling with humor. He could not be called handsome & yet there was something very attractive about his face. The speech I shall not pretend to report. Without the Gov’s inevitable manner it would be spared of much of its beauty and point. He presented his competitor Mr. Holden in a most ridiculous light. I hardly think any of those who heard the speech will vote for Mr. Holden. His speech was here & there & everywhere interspersed with anecdote always exactly applicable. There were many very witty & some very eloquent things in the speech but of course like every political speech it was made to suit the crowd & consequently there were some very coarse things & he was rather inclined to be irreverent. The close of the speech was glorious. The day dawn will soon be followed by the full sun of blessed peace if the people at home would only be true to the army as the army was true to the country. He was grateful for the unammity with which the people had elected him to office & if he met with their approval next election he would endeavor to do his duty but if not he would return to the army from which he was called. In the afternoon the Gov went up to the Arsenal to review the troops. Cousin Albert, Sally & I went up. I don’t there has been such a crowd in the grounds since the day it was surrended to our forces by the Yankees. There were only five companies of Infantry and of Cavalry at the Arsenal. It must have been a pitiful sight to the Gov who had just returned from a visit to Lee’s great Army. Though to us it was quite an imposing sight, altogether I enjoyed the day finely. That evening a great deal of ladies and gentlemen called upon the Gov to pay their respected. Saturday he went up on the cars to address the people at Egypt. He returned to F that night pretty well worn out & was confined to his room all day Sunday. He started to Raleigh Monday.

 

Source: Malinda Ray Diary, Anna Sutton Sherman Papers, North Carolina State Archives.  See also David A. Ray Papers, Southern Historical Collection, UNC-Chapel Hill

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Monday March 28th [1864]

News was rec’d here last week by the family of the death of Maggie F Nash. She died the 22d in Charlotte after a few days illness of pneumonia before any of her relatives could reach her.

 

Source: Malinda Ray Diary, Anna Sutton Sherman Papers, North Carolina State Archives.  See also David A. Ray Papers, Southern Historical Collection, UNC-Chapel Hill

nash obit

 

Source: Fayetteville Observer, March 28, 1864 as found on http://www.ncecho.org.

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