Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Military’ Category

Homemade coat features homespun lining. Collections of the North Carolina Museum of History, accession number 1965.78.1

Homemade coat features homespun lining.
Collections of the North Carolina Museum of History, accession number 1965.78.1

Uniform Coat

 

Used in the Civil War by Dixon G. Conn of Raleigh.  Damage to the upper arm of coat is evidence of a wound sustained by Conn at the Malvern Hill, July 1, 1862. Although Conn was severaly wounded in the shoulder, hip, thigh, and leg, he returned to duty for a brief period at the end of 1862 but was discharged in early 1863 by reason of disability from his wounds.

Conn was first mustered in as a private with the 15th NC State Troops (later Company K 32nd NCST) and later promoted to First Sergeant.

Homemade coat features homespun lining. Non-original CSA buttons (1870-1880 reproductions)

Homemade coat features homespun lining.  Collections of the North Carolina Museum of History, accession number 1965.78.1

Homemade coat features homespun lining.
Collections of the North Carolina Museum of History, accession number 1965.78.1

Homemade coat features homespun lining.  Collections of the North Carolina Museum of History, accession number 1965.78.1

Homemade coat features homespun lining.
Collections of the North Carolina Museum of History, accession number 1965.78.1

Collections of the North Carolina Museum of History, accession number 1965.78.1

Read Full Post »

Camp coat of Maj. Gen. Robert F. Hoke. NC Museum of History Accession Number 19xx.330.35

Camp coat of Maj. Gen. Robert F. Hoke. NC Museum of History Accession Number 19xx.330.35

Camp Coat, made for Major General Robert F. Hoke.  Single breasted front closure. Thin brown wool with standing collar.  Body of coat/shirt gathered to waist band. Patch pockets. Trimmed with dark blue twill wool tape. Three small three piece New York State buttons at neck and two on waist band. Two two piece US cuff buttons on cuffs. One engraved and shaped copper star on collar with evidence of three on each side. Shoulder yoke lined with white cotton with brown checked stripes with the rest unlined.

Camp coat of Maj. Gen. Robert F. Hoke. NC Museum of History Accession Number 19xx.330.35

Camp coat of Maj. Gen. Robert F. Hoke. NC Museum of History Accession Number 19xx.330.35

 

Image of Major General Robert F. Hoke, NC Museum of History Accession Number 19xx.94.21

Image of Major General Robert F. Hoke, NC Museum of History Accession Number 19xx.94.21

Source: North Carolina Museum of History, Accession number 19xx.330.35

Read Full Post »

At a Confederate Veteran’s Reunion in the 1930s, audio and video recordings of the “Rebel Yell” were made and now available on YouTube:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s6jSqt39vFM

 

Read Full Post »

Military Terms – the Difference between Grape, Canister, Shrapnel, and Shell

Grape consists of nine shot arranged in three layers, which vary in size according to the caliber of the gun; they are held together by two plates of about one-fourteenth of an inch less diameter than the caliber of the gun, two rings, a bolt and a nut. The canvas bag arrangement is too old for this war; it is not so simple or durable, and has not been used for years. Canister for a gun contains twenty-seven small cast iron balls, arranged in four layers, the top of six, the remainder of seven each; for a howitzer, it contains forty-eight small iron balls, in four layers of twelve each; for the same caliber you will see that the balls for canister are in a tip cylinder, closed at the bottom by a thick cast iron plate or a wooden sabot, and at the top a sheet iron plate, with a handle attached; the interstices between the balls are closely packed with sawdust, to prevent crowding when the piece is fixed. Shrapnel consists of a very thin shell, which is filled with musket balls; the interstices are then filled by pouring in melted sulphur, when a hold is bored through the sulphur and bullets to receive the bursting charge.

Now to explain the difference between “Shrapnel” of “spherical case” and a “shell:’ The destructive force of a shrapnel is what it receives from the charge in the gun, the powder in the shrapnel being only to break the envelope and spread the balls, they still moving forward by the force of the impulse they received from the charge in the gun. A shell is made very much thicker than the envelope of a shrapnel, and is nearly filled with powder, and will do great execution if it explodes on the ground, it having destructive qualities in itself, aside from the discharge of the gun. A shrapnel shell has only half of the charge of powder that a shell proper has; thus a 24-pounder shrapnel contains one hundred and seventy-five musket balls and six ounces of powder. A 6-pounder shrapnel has thirty-nine musket balls and twenty-five ounces of powder.

Source: Fayetteville Observer, November 9, 1863 as found on www.ncecho.org

Read Full Post »

See the Conservation Process for Civil War Uniforms!

Interior detail of the Ruffin Frock Coat. NC Museum of History

Interior detail of the Ruffin Frock Coat. NC Museum of History before conservation.

The Ruffin Frock Coat after conservation care. NC Museum of History.

The Ruffin Frock Coat after conservation care. NC Museum of History.

The bloodied coat of Lt. Col. Thomas Ruffin of Johnston County, worn when he was mortally wounded in battle in Virginia Oct. 15, 1863, is a challenge for N.C. Museum of History Conservator Paige Myers. As a conservator she seeks to prevent further damage to textiles in her care even as the ravages of war are still evident.

During a live webcast September 10 from the N.C. Museum of History, you can get a behind-the-scenes look at a working textile conservation lab and see some of techniques Myers uses to conserve Civil War uniforms.

Some of the highlights of the program will include:

  • A demonstration of treatment for the blood-stained frock coat worn by Lt. Col. Thomas H. Ruffin, of Franklin County
  • A look at the moth eaten frock coat of Col. Dennis D. Ferebee of Camden County
  • Discussion on the various treatments that conservators use to preserve Civil War-era fabrics and uniforms
  • The chance to ask Myers questions about her work and textiles in the museum’s collection via email and live chat

The webcast will be held on Tuesday, September 10 from 6 to 7 p.m., and an Internet connection is all that is required to participate. To register, simply fill out the form at http://www.ncdcr.gov/CivilWarTextiles.

This program is the first in a series organized by the Connecting to Collections Project (C2C) of the N.C. Department of Cultural Resources, in cooperation with the N.C. Museum of History. Future programs will examine the conservation of flags and garments from civilian life during the Civil War. The entire series is made possible thanks to a federal grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

Read Full Post »

Burgwyn Spur H1932.11.2

One of H.K. Burgwyn’s Spurs, as returned to his family after his death at Gettysburg. North Carolina Museum of History, Accession Number H1932.11.1-2

Burgwyn's sword, sent to his family. See today's earlier post on the logistics of returning personal effects to family at hom.

Burgwyn’s sword, sent to his family. See today’s earlier post on the logistics of returning personal effects to family at home. North Carolina Museum of History, Accession Number H1914.174.1

Depiction of HK Burgwyn by Don Troani. North Carolina Museum of History Accession Number H1989.139.1

Depiction of HK Burgwyn by Don Troani. North Carolina Museum of History Accession Number H1989.139.1

Read Full Post »

Be of good cheer I overcame the world saith one who is mighty

 

Camp near NewbernN.C.

103rd Reg’t, Co., A. U.S.A.,

Friday, April 3rd 1863

 

Dear Father And Mother,

With pleasure I write to let you know that I still am on the land of the living, And still occupy our barrack at Old Newbern.  We have been laying almost inactive since returning from our Hyde Co. Expedition.  If I were to tell you the reason we lay here inactive was on account of the drifting sand you would think it strange, for I suppose the mud covers the surface of the ground around my old native home, this time in the year.  But here the soil is a fine sand and if it rains the water soaks through and the wind from the rivers and plains soon dries off and begins to drift like our snow used to do in old Penna

When writing my last letter I neglected or rather forgot to till you of the Rebels comeing here to Newbern while we were on our march to Hyde Co.  On the morning of the 14th of March our boys tell  us the Rebel Gen. Petigrew came here or near with a force and demanded a surrender.  Gen Foster “would’ent” The rebels got their Canon in range and threw shot Shell and Grape at the 92nd N.Y.V. entrenchments. (92nd is posted on the other side of the river from us, their fort, or entrenchments are between two swamps Consequently there is only one road for that enemy to come in) the 92nd was the only Reg’t that was on that side of the river they lay close behind their breast works and the showers of Iron hail did not much damage, the Gunboats getting [rang] the enimy thought It prudent to retire.  I suppose they had an Idea that they could come in and take possesion after our forces having possesion for one year.  that morning one year ago, Gen Burnside took possesion of this City.

We have had the most pleasent time soldiering since coming here in the first place we have had good barracks, and what makes it far pleasenter for me, I can go to Newbern to preaching.  on last sabbath I was to a sabbath school.  It looked quite natural.  I almost fancied myself seated in old Kuhns-School House.  here were Southern Children in place of our little Pennsylvanians.  There is also a Colored Sabbath school.  The superintendent of the white sabbath (which was a major of one of our Regts here) remarked at the close of the school that there were teachers wanted for this negro sabbath school.  If I live and keep my health and were permitted to stay here, I will go to this sabbath school and learn these poor little negroes all I can, and think it an honerable position in the army of my Lord and Savior.  I would attend this black school regular, but the time of school comes at the time of an inspection (9 Oclock)

As I am writing I hear the boom of the Canon at little Washington about 40 miles from here by land. the Rebels are trying to take it. they will hardly succeed for our Gunboats from here went to lend a helping hand.

A soldier almost feels like yielding to discouragements betimes, But when I begin to fell discouraged, take the good old book, and I see I am carried on flowy beds of ease to what some poor Christians were before me.  when I read and see what Gods people have come through, I fell to say.

“Let Cares like a wild deluge come.

“And storms of sorrow fall.

“So I but safely reach my home

“My God, my heaven, my all.”

If I never should meet you on this side of the grave, weep not for me I’ll meet You in Heaven.

Your son Jno. T.E. [V.D.?] Rupert

 

Written in folds:

Give my Respect to all my brothers, and sisters and tell them to be good little folks.

Give my Respect to James Kline and family.

 

Source: Union soldier, Johnathan Rupert, letter  to his parents.  Tryon Palace Collections, New Bern, NC. Accession # 2008.006.002.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »