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Archive for the ‘Receipts’ Category

Recipe for Blackberry Wine

Measure your berries and bruise them; to every gallon add one quart of boiling water, let the mixture stand twenty-four hours, stirring occasionally, then strain off the liquor into a cask; to every gallon add two pounds of sugar, cork tight, and let it stand till following October, and you will have wine ready for use without any further straining or boiling, that will make lips smack as they never smacked under similar influence before.

Source: Confederate Receipt Book: Over 100 Recipes, Cures, and Camp & Household Hints to Deal with Wartime Conditions and Shortages. (Richmond, Virginia: West & Johnston, 1863)

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Ginger Beer

One pint of molasses and two spoonfuls of ginger put into a pail, to be half filled with boiling water; when well stirred together, fill the pail with cold water, leaving room for one pint of yeast, which must not be put in until lukewarm. Put it on a warm hearth for the night, and bottle in the morning.

Source: Confederate Receipt Book: Over 100 Recipes, Cures, and Camp & Household Hints to Deal with Wartime Conditions and Shortages. (Richmond, Virginia: West & Johnston, 1863)

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A Receipt for Beer

Eight quarts water, one quart molasses, one pint yeast, one tablespoonful cream of tartar, mixed and bottled in twenty-four hours; or, to two pounds of coarse brown sugar add two gallons of water, and nearly two ounces hops. Let the whole boil three quarters of an hour, and then work as usual. It should stand a week or ten days before being drawn, and will improve daily afterward for a moderate time.

 

 

Source: Confederate Receipt Book: Over 100 Recipes, Cures, and Camp & Household Hints to Deal with Wartime Conditions and Shortages. (Richmond, Virginia: West & Johnston, 1863)

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To Dye Crimson

To two gallons of the juice of pokeberries, when they are quite ripe, add half a gallon of strong cider vinegar, to dye one pound of wool, which must be firs washed very clean with hard soap. The wool, when wrung dry, is to be put into the vinegar and pokeberry juice, and simmered in a copper kettle for one hour. Then take it out, let it drip a while, and spread it in the sun. The vessel must be free of grease of any kind.

 

Source: John Hammond Moore, ed., The Confederate Housewife (Columbia, SC: Summerhouse Press, 1997) as found in Confederate States Almanac, 1864

 

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Green tomato catsup that will keep both summer and winter
Pick a bushel of tomatoes when quite green, cut off the stems, boil soft, rub through a sieve, set the pulp on the fire, and season highly with red pepper; of cloves, allspice, and mace, each half an ounce; salt to taste. To this add a half gallon of good vinegar and boil half an hour. If liked, add four onions, chopped fine. Will keep without sealing.
Source: John Hammond Moore, ed., The Confederate Housewife (Columbia, SC: Summerhouse Press, 1997) as found in Southern Recorder, March 29, 1864

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Soft soap

Bore some holes in a lye barrel, put some straw in the bottom, lay some unslacked lime on it, and fill your barrel with good hard wood ashes, wet it, and pound it down as you put it in. When full, make a basin in the ashes and pour in water, keep filling it as it sinks in the ashes. In the course of a few hours the lye will begin to run. When you have a sufficient quantity to begin with, put your grease in a large iron pot, pour in the lye, let it boil, &etc. Three pounds of clean grease are allowed for two gallons of soap.

 

Source: Confederate Receipt Book: Over 100 Recipes, Cures, and Camp & Household Hints to Deal with Wartime Conditions and Shortages. (Richmond, Virginia: West & Johnston, 1863)

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Substitute for Coffee

Take sound ripe acorns, wash them while in the shell, dry them, and parch until they open, take the shell off, roast with a little bacon fat, and you will have a splendid cup of coffee.

Source: Confederate Receipt Book: Over 100 Recipes, Cures, and Camp & Household Hints to Deal with Wartime Conditions and Shortages. (Richmond, Virginia: West & Johnston, 1863)

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