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Archive for the ‘Sewing/Costume’ Category

Camp coat of Maj. Gen. Robert F. Hoke. NC Museum of History Accession Number 19xx.330.35

Camp coat of Maj. Gen. Robert F. Hoke. NC Museum of History Accession Number 19xx.330.35

Camp Coat, made for Major General Robert F. Hoke.  Single breasted front closure. Thin brown wool with standing collar.  Body of coat/shirt gathered to waist band. Patch pockets. Trimmed with dark blue twill wool tape. Three small three piece New York State buttons at neck and two on waist band. Two two piece US cuff buttons on cuffs. One engraved and shaped copper star on collar with evidence of three on each side. Shoulder yoke lined with white cotton with brown checked stripes with the rest unlined.

Camp coat of Maj. Gen. Robert F. Hoke. NC Museum of History Accession Number 19xx.330.35

Camp coat of Maj. Gen. Robert F. Hoke. NC Museum of History Accession Number 19xx.330.35

 

Image of Major General Robert F. Hoke, NC Museum of History Accession Number 19xx.94.21

Image of Major General Robert F. Hoke, NC Museum of History Accession Number 19xx.94.21

Source: North Carolina Museum of History, Accession number 19xx.330.35

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Woven black and red check dress of cotton and wool.  Lined bodice, with brown standup collar.  Set in sleeves have wide cuffs.  Skirt is pleated to waistband and has a set in pocket.  The dress features a rolled hem and a large tuck near the hem to shorten the skirt.  This dress is related to dress featured in this blog post as they came from the same donor family and are both attributed to ca. 1860.

Dimensions:

FROM BACK OF NECK TO HEM  53 3/4″
W-AT SHOULDER SEAMS   14 15/16″
CIRCUMFERENCE OF WAIST    33 7/8″ 

(Both of these dresses are in the collections of North Carolina State Historic Sites)

Collections of the Department of Cultural Resources can be searched online here!

Woven Red and Black Plaid Dress, collections of North Carolina State Historic Sites, Accession Number S.HS.2013.4.2

Woven Red and Black Plaid Dress, collections of North Carolina State Historic Sites, Accession Number S.HS.2013.4.2

Pocket Detail, woven Red and Black Plaid Dress, collections of North Carolina State Historic Sites, Accession Number S.HS.2013.4.2

Pocket Detail, woven Red and Black Plaid Dress, collections of North Carolina State Historic Sites, Accession Number S.HS.2013.4.2

Hem detail, woven Red and Black Plaid Dress, collections of North Carolina State Historic Sites, Accession Number S.HS.2013.4.2

Hem detail, woven Red and Black Plaid Dress, collections of North Carolina State Historic Sites, Accession Number S.HS.2013.4.2

Cuff detail, woven Red and Black Plaid Dress, collections of North Carolina State Historic Sites, Accession Number S.HS.2013.4.2

Cuff detail, woven Red and Black Plaid Dress, collections of North Carolina State Historic Sites, Accession Number S.HS.2013.4.2

Collar detail, woven Red and Black Plaid Dress, collections of North Carolina State Historic Sites, Accession Number S.HS.2013.4.2

Collar detail, woven Red and Black Plaid Dress, collections of North Carolina State Historic Sites, Accession Number S.HS.2013.4.2

Interior bodice detail, woven Red and Black Plaid Dress, collections of North Carolina State Historic Sites, Accession Number S.HS.2013.4.2

Interior bodice detail, woven Red and Black Plaid Dress, collections of North Carolina State Historic Sites, Accession Number S.HS.2013.4.2

Waistband detail, woven Red and Black Plaid Dress, collections of North Carolina State Historic Sites, Accession Number S.HS.2013.4.2
Waistband detail, woven Red and Black Plaid Dress, collections of North Carolina State Historic Sites, Accession Number S.HS.2013.4.2

 

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Plaid dress, waist detail. Piedmont NC. Collections of North Carolina State Historic Sites.  Accession number 2013.4.1

Plaid dress, waist detail. Piedmont NC. Collections of North Carolina State Historic Sites. Accession number HS 2013.4.1

Plaid dress, Piedmont NC. Collections of North Carolina State Historic Sites.  Accession number 2013.4.1

Plaid dress, Piedmont NC. Collections of North Carolina State Historic Sites. Accession number  HS 2013.4.1

Inside Hem detail. Plaid dress, Piedmont NC. Collections of North Carolina State Historic Sites.  Accession number 2013.4.1

Inside Hem detail. Plaid dress, Piedmont NC. Collections of North Carolina State Historic Sites. Accession number HS 2013.4.1

Plaid dress, collar detail. Piedmont NC. Collections of North Carolina State Historic Sites.  Accession number 2013.4.1

Plaid dress, collar detail. Piedmont NC. Collections of North Carolina State Historic Sites. Accession number HS 2013.4.1

Loosely woven in blue, green, and peach.  Handsewn throughout.  Center closure at bodice originally with hooks and eyes.  Three panel skirt is gauged with a two inch hem.

Plaid dress, detail. Collections of NC State Historic Sites.

Plaid dress, detail. Collections of NC State Historic Sites.

As resources became stretched thin by 1863, women of North Carolina were spinning, weaving, and sewing their own clothes.  Several instances of “homespun” have already been seen in our posts from Cornelia Henry, Catherine Edmondston, and in other museum pieces.

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See the Conservation Process for Civil War Uniforms!

Interior detail of the Ruffin Frock Coat. NC Museum of History

Interior detail of the Ruffin Frock Coat. NC Museum of History before conservation.

The Ruffin Frock Coat after conservation care. NC Museum of History.

The Ruffin Frock Coat after conservation care. NC Museum of History.

The bloodied coat of Lt. Col. Thomas Ruffin of Johnston County, worn when he was mortally wounded in battle in Virginia Oct. 15, 1863, is a challenge for N.C. Museum of History Conservator Paige Myers. As a conservator she seeks to prevent further damage to textiles in her care even as the ravages of war are still evident.

During a live webcast September 10 from the N.C. Museum of History, you can get a behind-the-scenes look at a working textile conservation lab and see some of techniques Myers uses to conserve Civil War uniforms.

Some of the highlights of the program will include:

  • A demonstration of treatment for the blood-stained frock coat worn by Lt. Col. Thomas H. Ruffin, of Franklin County
  • A look at the moth eaten frock coat of Col. Dennis D. Ferebee of Camden County
  • Discussion on the various treatments that conservators use to preserve Civil War-era fabrics and uniforms
  • The chance to ask Myers questions about her work and textiles in the museum’s collection via email and live chat

The webcast will be held on Tuesday, September 10 from 6 to 7 p.m., and an Internet connection is all that is required to participate. To register, simply fill out the form at http://www.ncdcr.gov/CivilWarTextiles.

This program is the first in a series organized by the Connecting to Collections Project (C2C) of the N.C. Department of Cultural Resources, in cooperation with the N.C. Museum of History. Future programs will examine the conservation of flags and garments from civilian life during the Civil War. The entire series is made possible thanks to a federal grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

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Wages of Seamstresses

We learn, with much satisfaction, that Qr. Master Wilson, of the Clothing Department in this city [Raleigh], has arranged a scale of prices to increase the pay of the females who make up the garments, and that is only requires the approval of the Acting Adjutant General to be carried into effect. We know that Gov. Vance and Capt. Wilson have been in favor of the increase for some time.

Source: Fayetteville Observer, March 2, 1863 as found on www.ncecho.org

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The Comfort Cloak – A substitute for Overcoats and Blankets for Our Army

Take a sufficient quantity of common shirting, dye it brown with the black walnut, cut it, and make it in the form of a large, loose cloak, without sleeves, leaving slits for the arms. Wad it with cotton batting, in thin layers like a quilt, fix an oil cape on it, reaching down to the waist, the throat and breast part to be fastened with strings – and you have the most complete cloak and blanket ever slept in, and much lighter than a woolen coat. The object of the oil cloth cape is to protect the garment as well as the arms from the rain. The collar should be made wide so as to cover the ears and neck when raised.

 

Source: Yorkville Enquirer, November 5, 1862, as found in John Hammond Moore, ed., The Confederate Housewife (Columbia, SC: Summerhouse Press, 1997).

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French Millinery

The undersigned takes this method to notify the Ladies of Charlotte, and the surrounding country, that they have engaged Miss F. Brown to take full charge of their MILLINERY DEPARTMENT, and we would state that we have received a splendid lot of LADIES goods suitable for the season.

Consisting of FRENCH ARTIFICIALS, a superior invoice of Bonnet, Ribbons, also Bonnets of every variety, Straw, Metropolitan, Drab, and Black Bonnet Materials of all shades, Blond Laces, Rouches, and Plaid Silks, &c., &c.

MISS BROWN will be pleased to wait upon all who may call upon her, and will endeavor to give entire satisfaction, in producing the latest fashions from Paris, and A’la Confederate style.

We would also return our heartfelt  thanks to all who have favoured us with their patronage, and we will do our utmost to merit a continuance, and most cordially invite citizens and strangers to visit our establishment before buying elsewhere.

Kahnsweiller & Bros

Source: North Carolina Whig (Charlotte), NC October 21, 1862 as found in www.digitalnc.org

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