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Posts Tagged ‘flax’

Hand Towel

Hand towel made by Adeline Loftin of Denton, NC in 1863. NC Museum of History.

Hand towel made by Adeline Loftin of Denton, NC in 1863. NC Museum of History.

Lace detail, hand towel made by Adeline Loftin of Denton, NC in 1863. NC Museum of History.

Lace detail, hand towel made by Adeline Loftin of Denton, NC in 1863. NC Museum of History.

White hand towel with crocheted lace.  Family tradition said that the towel was made by Adeline Loftin of Denton, NC in 1863.  Ms. Loftin grew the flax, spun the yarn, wove the fabric, and crocheted the lace.

 

Source: Museum of History Collection, accession number 2005.170.1

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Wednesday 27th [July 1864]

I began Mr. Henry’s flax pants today. Anon Jones spent the day here. Mr. Henry in the oats all day. Cloudy today with a little rain this evening. Corn is needed rain a little now. The children are learning very fast. I teach them morning & evening. Zona can read in three letters & Pinck can read & spell very well.

 

Source: Diary of Cornelia Henry in Fear in North Carolina: The Civil War Journal and Letters of the Henry Family. Clinard, Karen L. and Russell, Richard, eds. (Asheville, NC: Reminiscing Books, 2008).

 

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Thursday 14th [July 1864]

I finished Pinck’s pants & began his coat. Mr. Henry & Pinck went down on the creek yesterday evening & gathered a pan full of nice raspberries. We had two pies for dinner & will have enough for two tomorrow. Jinnie baked them this evening & some molasses bread. I sent Lonzo to town this evening after the sley. Mrs. Fanning warped the thread Tuesday. Tena spooled it Tuesday & cleaned the flax. ‘Tis only ten yds. to be filled with flax & five tow for Mr. Henry’s pants & coat. Atheline seems to be sinking very fast. She is very feeble, can’t sit up any at all. She seems perfectly resigned to die. Jim Henry, Joe Russell & jims orderly staid here tonight. A very hard rain this evening & ‘tis reported that Gen. Early has burned Washington City & had captured Harpers Ferry. I hope ‘tis so.

 

Friday 15th [July 1864]

I sewed some on Pinck’s coat today, would have finished it but went up to sit with Atheline a while. She is still in her right mind. She told me this evening she was going to di. I hate to think she will soon be gone but ‘tis best. He doeth all things well. Mrs. Fanning got the cloth tied in this evening. Sister Jane sent a seven hundred sley instead of a six after she had put it in she had to take it out. I borrowed a seven of Mrs. A.B. Jones. No further news of the burning of Washington City. There is a great deal of sickness in the country & town too. Typhoid fever. Edom Cole & four of his children have died in a month. Lord bless us with health & guard us from our enemies. May we not fall in their hands I pray.

 

Source: Diary of Cornelia Henry in Fear in North Carolina: The Civil War Journal and Letters of the Henry Family. Clinard, Karen L. and Russell, Richard, eds. (Asheville, NC: Reminiscing Books, 2008).

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Thursday 26th [May 1864]

I made Sam’s other pants today & sewed some on Hanes.’ Mr. Henry went to Asheville today. Charley took the wagon & some flax seed. Sam & George went. George is implicated with trading with one of Hugh Johnston’s negroes, something about stolen corn. They gave George about 50 licks. I hope it will do him good. Johnston said it was Sam & Charley first but the negro said George. Johnston has a spite at Sam & wanted to get him into trouble. I am glad he is clear. It wounded his feelings a good deal to think was accused of stealing.

 

Saturday May 18th 1864

Betsey McKinnish picked wool here yesterday & today. It is not quite dry as it has rained nearly every day since it was put out. Yesterday was bright, rather cool mornings & Evenings. I had the toothache last night, neuralgia I think. I have had it several nights this week.

I finished Jim’s pants & washed the children & cleaned them. Matt & Mary Tutt went to Mrs. Joe Green’s this morning, a long walk I think. Blair was to sell Mr. Henry’s flour at auction but Pat Thrash pressed it for the government. I think he acted badly. Mr. Henry’s fine horse Clarion is improving some. He thinks he has been foundered a little. We took in all the wool this evening as it rained. Jennie hoed out the flowers in the front yard, cleaned the candlesticks & baked some molasses bread for the children. George seems very much chagrinned at his strapping. He has not been to his meals since.

 

Source: Diary of Cornelia Henry in Fear in North Carolina: The Civil War Journal and Letters of the Henry Family. Clinard, Karen L. and Russell, Richard, eds. (Asheville, NC: Reminiscing Books, 2008).

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Monday 23rd [May 1864]

I cut eight pairs pants today & nearly made George’s. ‘Tis very sorrow cloth but tolerable thick. Matt spinning for her dresses. I have had the wool commenced on today. Fannie & Tena washing it. The other hands planting potatoes in the meadow. Billie Ledford is at work here. Bently still working at flax. Mr. Henry thinks he will not raise any more as it costs too much. Not much news tonight. The fight still goes on at Richmond in our favor.

Tuesday 24th [May 1864]

I finished George’s pants, made Lonzo a pair & began Sam’s today. I wrote a long letter to Pinck, Dora & Matt yesterday evening & sent him some raisings & candy in the letter. He will be delighted & know he is a good boy, affectionate. I think Willie will be a good deal like him. Zona is very affectionate too. Gus is a lovely baby, tries to talk. Atheline is not improving much. She sews a little every day on a quilt of mine. Her babe does not nurse her at all, only the bottle. It is growing some. I fear she will never be well again. I fear she has consumption. She has been a faithful nurse to my children.

Source: Diary of Cornelia Henry in Fear in North Carolina: The Civil War Journal and Letters of the Henry Family. Clinard, Karen L. and Russell, Richard, eds. (Asheville, NC: Reminiscing Books, 2008).

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Tuesday 10th [May 1864]

I began my calico dress today, did but little to it. The sleeves are made after a pattern I got from Till yesterday. I will frill the cap & around the waist. It is gathered on top. Mr. Henry got the dress last Spring in Columbia, gave $3.50 a yd. I thought that high, but now calico is selling at ten dollars a yard. Mr. Henry received his resignation accepted. I am so very glad, now he will stay at home. He did not go to Asheville today as he is relieved from the court marshal. An old man stayed here last night, night that Capt. Parker robbed in Cherokee. Mr. Henry knew him, named Draper. He will stay here till Thursday & then he has to go to Asheville again.

 

Wednesday 11th [May 1864]

I sewed on my dress today, finished the sleeves. They look very nice. Rained nearly all day today. Several men here tonight. Edwards will finish the sheep tomorrow. Old Bently has been here this week breaking flax, still at it. The fight began at Richmond the 6th. We are victors so far. I hope we may be able to whip them good there & that peace may soon dawn on our bleeding country. Oh Lord help us in this our great conflict. Give our men courage & our Generals wisdom. May we come out conquerors & Oh Lord I pray Thee grant us a speedy peace.

 

 

Source: Diary of Cornelia Henry in Fear in North Carolina: The Civil War Journal and Letters of the Henry Family. Clinard, Karen L. and Russell, Richard, eds. (Asheville, NC: Reminiscing Books, 2008).

 

 

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Tuesday March 1st [1864]

Mr. Henry & I went to walk this morning up by the flax patch by the spring & then by Betsey McKinnish’s & then to where they were plowing back of stables & got back about 10 o’clock. I finished my dress today. ‘tis open in front with facings in front. A soldier stays here tonight, also Cousin William Henry of Henderson Co. We have had some rain this evening. It is needed for small grain.

Source: Diary of Cornelia Henry in Fear in North Carolina: The Civil War Journal and Letters of the Henry Family. Clinard, Karen L. and Russell, Richard, eds. (Asheville, NC: Reminiscing Books, 2008).

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