Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Modern Greece’

 

Flat Iron

Flat iron from the wreck of the blockade runner Modern Greece.  NC Museum of History Collections, Accession number 1972.97.85

Flat iron from the wreck of the blockade runner Modern Greece. NC Museum of History Collections, Accession number 1972.97.85

Has maker’s mark “Tho. Green” stamped on upper side. Handle missing.

Recovered from the wreck of the Modern Greece, a blockade runner that ran aground on June 27, 1862 while attempting to run the blockade near Fort Fisher.

 

Flat iron from the wreck of the blockade runner Modern Greece.  NC Museum of History Collections, Accession number 1972.97.85

Flat iron from the wreck of the blockade runner Modern Greece. NC Museum of History Collections, Accession number 1972.97.85

 

The Modern Greece was a British-owned steamer that ran aground on June 27, 1862 while trying to run the Union blockade near Fort Fisher. The vessel was carrying hardware, munitions and other items such as forks, spoons, rifles and surgeon’s kits bound for the Confederate states. The steamer was fired upon by the USS Stars & Stripes and the USS Cambridge before the crew abandoned ship and it eventually sank. Some goods were retrieved by Confederate forces. The wreck of the ship was excavated in 1962 and artifacts such as ingots, bayonets, pocketknives, and shoes were recovered. The Blockade Runner Modern Greece and Her Cargo. Leslie S. Bright, Archaeology Section, Division of Archives and History, Raleigh, 1977.

 

Source: North Carolina Museum of History accession number 1972.97.85.

 

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Spoon. Steel, plated with silver, nickel, or tin. Excavated from the wreck of the blockade runner, Modern Greece, which sank June 28, 1862 off Fort Fisher.

Spoon, excavated from the wreck of the Modern Greece blockade runner, sunk 1862. NC Museum of History, accession number 1970.12.1.

Spoon, excavated from the wreck of the Modern Greece blockade runner, sunk 1862. NC Museum of History, accession number 1970.12.1.

Source: North Carolina Museum of History, Accession Number 1970.12.1.

Read Full Post »

Bowie Knife from Blockade Runner Modern Greece.  Collections of North Carolina State Historic Sites, Accession number 1978.71.xx.

Bowie Knife from Blockade Runner Modern Greece. Collections of North Carolina State Historic Sites, Accession number 1978.71.xx.

Long, drop point blade with brass “S” shaped guard, antler grip, and brass ferrule and buttcap.  Recovered from the wreck of the blockade runner Modern Greece, which sank after running aground off Fort Fisher on June 27, 1862 during an attempt to run the blockade with its valuable cargo.

Source: Collections of North Carolina State Historic Sites, Accession number 1978.71.xx.

Read Full Post »

Museum Monday – artifacts from the wreck of the Modern Greece, a blockade runner that was sunk in 1862 off Fort Fisher.

Knife recovered from wreck of Modern Greece.  Made in Germany.

Knife recovered from wreck of Modern Greece. Made in Germany.

knife from Modern Greece 1972.97.53 detail

Detail of the pommel from the knife found on the Modern Greece. Collections of the North Carolina Museum of History. Accession number 1972.97.53

Many artifacts from the ship have been preserved and are on exhibit at museums and historic sites throughout eastern North Carolina.

More information on the ship: She was built in England in 1859 and ran ashore during her first blockade run on June 27, 1862.  Both sides tried to prevent salvage activities by the other after she ran aground although the Confederates were able to offload a small portion of her cargo before large sections of the hull were damaged by Union bombardment. Read more here: Modern Greece entry in Cape Fear Civil War Shipwreck Register

The Underwater Archaeology unit of the Department of Cultural Resources has worked for 50 years to conserve the remains of the Modern Greece.  As the anniversary of her sinking approached, the agency renewed its efforts: http://www.newsobserver.com/2012/03/08/1913723/reburied-treasure.html

A brief YouTube video on saving the wreck’s artifacts: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5mdT8SKWWNA

Read Full Post »

White one piece footed sauce boat with saucer. Embossed foliage design on edge, handles at each side. Black transfer print “Modern Greece” and the year 1859. Salvaged and conserved from the wreck of the Modern Greece blockade runner.
Source: Collections of the North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources, State Historic Sites. Accession number S.1965.58.1. Search the collections of NCDCR

A letter from Lewis Warlick to his sweetheart this morning discussed the sinking of a blockade runner called the Modern Greece.  Many artifacts from the ship have been preserved and are on exhibit at museums and historic sites throughout eastern North Carolina.

More information on the ship: She was built in England in 1859 and ran ashore during her first blockade run on June 27, 1862.  Both sides tried to prevent salvage activities by the other after she ran aground although the Confederates were able to offload a small portion of her cargo before large sections of the hull were damaged by Union bombardment. Read more here: Modern Greece entry in Cape Fear Civil War Shipwreck Register

The Underwater Archaeology unit of the Department of Cultural Resources has worked for 50 years to conserve the remains of the Modern Greece.  As the anniversary of her sinking approached, the agency renewed its efforts: http://www.newsobserver.com/2012/03/08/1913723/reburied-treasure.html

A brief YouTube video on saving the wreck’s artifacts: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5mdT8SKWWNA

Read Full Post »

Wilmington,NC

July 5th 1862

Dearest Cornelia

Why is it that you don’t write, three weeks have lapsed since I heard from you and I am uneasy for fear there is something the matter. I have been looking with great anxiety for the last two weeks for letters and have received none. Perhaps you have no paper as you wrote to me some time since that you were out.  If that be the case you are excusable otherwise I don’t think you would be.  I suppose you get the news from the Richmondfight regularly  terrible fighting there wasn’t it? And I am glad to know that our forces are still pushing the enemy back. The last dispatch I have seen from the battle field was up to night before last. Then the enemy was in full retreat in CharlesCitycounty and our forces in pursuit. I hope they will kill and capture the last one of them. Already we have killed and captured thousands including five Generals captured one being next in command to McClellan (Maj Gen McCall)  Many wounded and dead are passing through every day; yesterday the remains of Col. Mears, of the 3rd Reg. was brought in — was killed at Richmond his body will be interred at the Cemetery to day with military honors our regiment being ordered out as an escort.

If we had gone on to Va.when we were ordered we would have been participants in that great battle; and then perhaps some of us would have breathed our last, notwithstanding all these considerations I would like to have been there to help drive back these heartless invaders from our beloved soil.

Our company left here last night at 10 for Masonboro sound eight miles distant to unload a schooner that run the blockade and is now in port safe. The reason I did not go was that it looked very much like raining and I have a cold and fearful if I got wet it would make me sick, and besides that I had a pain in my right eye, therefore I concluded it would be better for me to remain in camps. Two companies of our regiment have been for the last week unloading a valuable cargo near for Fort Fisher; the vessel was the Modern Greece ** from England, in attempting to run in the port the blockers cut her off and also got in her rear then the only chance for her to keep from falling as a prize into the hands of the Yankees was to beach her which was done in three fourths of a mile of Fort Fisher. The steamer is a total wreck and only about two thirds of the cargo (900 tons) was saved; her cargo consisted of seven thousand stand of arms, twenty seven hundred and seventy barrels of powder, gray cloth, domestic clothing, medicine, shoes, wines, brandies, salt, pepper, spice, cannon in fact every thing you could think of.  There is now another steamer lying outside the blockaders watching for an opportunity to run in. What kind of a time did you have at the quarterly meeting? Did you get the paper I sent you? I will send you more before long, if I can some better than that was. I think I will go down to the sound this evening and help the boys get off that cargo if it clears off.  Write often and a great deal to your kindest friend and _____

Lewis

Margin note: give my respects to sister and Susan. Lt. Parks had an other chill yesterday; Port, Pink and H. Parks are well.  Wm. McGimsey has been unwell but is getting better.

 

* See another post later today on the sinking and recovery of the Modern Greece.

 

 

Sources: Mike and Carol Lawing, eds., My Dearest Friend: The Civil War Correspondence of Cornelia McGimsey and Lewis Warlick (Durham,NC:Carolina Academic Press, 2000). Original collections of the papers are in the Laura Cornelia McGimsey Papers and the George Phifer Erwin Papers in the Southern Historical Collection, UNC Chapel Hill.

 

Read Full Post »