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Hand Towel

Hand towel made by Adeline Loftin of Denton, NC in 1863. NC Museum of History.

Hand towel made by Adeline Loftin of Denton, NC in 1863. NC Museum of History.

Lace detail, hand towel made by Adeline Loftin of Denton, NC in 1863. NC Museum of History.

Lace detail, hand towel made by Adeline Loftin of Denton, NC in 1863. NC Museum of History.

White hand towel with crocheted lace.  Family tradition said that the towel was made by Adeline Loftin of Denton, NC in 1863.  Ms. Loftin grew the flax, spun the yarn, wove the fabric, and crocheted the lace.

 

Source: Museum of History Collection, accession number 2005.170.1

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Spinning wheel . Part of a collection used by the Hearne family in Greenville, NC (Pitt County). Likely used by Nina Harris Redditt and Belle Hearne Harris.

 

Hearne family spinning wheel, Pitt County, NC. NC Museum of History Collections.

Hearne family spinning wheel, Pitt County, NC. NC Museum of History Collections.

Source: North Carolina Museum of History, accession number 1987.111.28

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Wednesday 17th [August 1864]

Eliza Patton came here Monday & spooled. I had the piece of flannel ready for the loom Tuesday. Eliza Patten worked till Tuesday at dinner. He & Tena got through spooling both pieces. She then went home. I began today my muslin dress Sister Jane gave me. Matt helped me some. It is made garabaldi waist. Mr. Henry went to town today & got his linen coat cut.

Source: Diary of Cornelia Henry in Fear in North Carolina: The Civil War Journal and Letters of the Henry Family. Clinard, Karen L. and Russell, Richard, eds. (Asheville, NC: Reminiscing Books, 2008).

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Thursday 28th [July 1864]

I finished Mr. Henry’s pants & mended some this evening. My head aches a good deal this evening. I think ‘tis from eating black berry pie at dinner. Anon Jones here for dinner today. He has just left. We are having a very good shower for the corn but I fear it will injure the oats. Tena is spinning wool to make Eugenia’s flannel of the mareno wool. It is very fine & soft. Mr. Henry sent Pinck & Lonzo to town last Tuesday after a newspaper. They staid all day as Pinck loaned Mollie Henry John to come to the farm. They took Sister Jane some apples & brought back a white rabbit in the basket. William Tidwell sent it to Zona. It is a beautiful pet. It stays upstairs. I am going to have a cage made for it. The children are delighted with it.

 

Source: Diary of Cornelia Henry in Fear in North Carolina: The Civil War Journal and Letters of the Henry Family. Clinard, Karen L. and Russell, Richard, eds. (Asheville, NC: Reminiscing Books, 2008).

 

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June 20, 1864

At the plantation with Mr E. We had sent for the girl Catherine Jackson. I tried to set forth, to her, her shortcomings & deficiencies in a firm yet kind light, particularly her utter want of veracity, her idleness, & her horrid unwomanly practice of chewing tobacco & her fancy for straying about the country alone. We have provided her with a home for more than a fortnight during which time she has barely spun a lb of cotton. Sent her to Mrs George Pope with an admonition that she would not please unless she was more industrious.

News but meagre from Petersburg but all good. Gen Lee telegraphs that we have retaken the entrenchments at Howlets, from whence we conclude that he is South of the James. Confirmation of the repulse of the enemy before Petersburg, which is now considered safe from their attacks. The slaughter was terrific on their side, ours slight. Not much news from the Valley & that not encouraging. They have taken & burned all the important buildings in Lexington & menace Lynchburg, but Breckenridge will, I hope, frustrate their designs. They have no supplies, no waggons, & live off the country, pillaging, robbing, & committing the most horrible outrages. Johnson still holds Sherman at bay. He dare not attack altho invited to do so. Morgan, we hear from the North, holding his own in Kentucky.

Source: Edmondston, Catherine Ann Devereux, 1823-1875, Journal of a Secesh Lady: The Diary of Catherine Ann Devereux Edmondston 1860-1866. Crabtree, Beth G and Patton, James W., (Raleigh, NC: North Carolina Division of Archives and History, 1979).http://nc-historical-publications.stores.yahoo.net/478.html

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Monday May 30th 1864

I cut some quilt pieces this morning & done some mending & after dinner I trimmed my hat & Gus’. Mine I trimmed with silk & velvet & Gus’ with yellow & white ribbon. They both look very neat. Mrs. Lance was here today & took home some tow to spin for bread. The poor of the country have a trying time for bread now. I hope they may get through & not suffer. I was sadly disappointed tonight by not getting a letter from Pinck. I hope he may be at home soon.

Source: Diary of Cornelia Henry in Fear in North Carolina: The Civil War Journal and Letters of the Henry Family. Clinard, Karen L. and Russell, Richard, eds. (Asheville, NC: Reminiscing Books, 2008).

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Monday 23rd [May 1864]

I cut eight pairs pants today & nearly made George’s. ‘Tis very sorrow cloth but tolerable thick. Matt spinning for her dresses. I have had the wool commenced on today. Fannie & Tena washing it. The other hands planting potatoes in the meadow. Billie Ledford is at work here. Bently still working at flax. Mr. Henry thinks he will not raise any more as it costs too much. Not much news tonight. The fight still goes on at Richmond in our favor.

Tuesday 24th [May 1864]

I finished George’s pants, made Lonzo a pair & began Sam’s today. I wrote a long letter to Pinck, Dora & Matt yesterday evening & sent him some raisings & candy in the letter. He will be delighted & know he is a good boy, affectionate. I think Willie will be a good deal like him. Zona is very affectionate too. Gus is a lovely baby, tries to talk. Atheline is not improving much. She sews a little every day on a quilt of mine. Her babe does not nurse her at all, only the bottle. It is growing some. I fear she will never be well again. I fear she has consumption. She has been a faithful nurse to my children.

Source: Diary of Cornelia Henry in Fear in North Carolina: The Civil War Journal and Letters of the Henry Family. Clinard, Karen L. and Russell, Richard, eds. (Asheville, NC: Reminiscing Books, 2008).

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