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Posts Tagged ‘theft’

Monday 25th [July 1864]

I fixed my new muslin dress today. It was too long in front & fixed Jinnie’s old muslin. No news of importance tonight from the army. Some men robbed old Mr. Fulton about ten miles from here last week. I am afraid they will be here before long. The robbers were blacked. They took money & clothes of Fulton’s. Mr. Henry in the oats all day. They are very ripe, need cutting faster than we can possibly cut them. Some government wagons here today for oats.

Source: Diary of Cornelia Henry in Fear in North Carolina: The Civil War Journal and Letters of the Henry Family. Clinard, Karen L. and Russell, Richard, eds. (Asheville, NC: Reminiscing Books, 2008).

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Sunday 5th June 1864

Cloudy this morning but little rain. Matt & Zona to church to the Academy. Mr. Reynolds preached. They have just got back. Mr. Henry & I & the children, Zona & Willie, will go to the Murray place this evening. I attended to Gus this morning & Rose went to Church. He is very little trouble but a great deal of pleasure to attend my children. I am weaning him. He sucked Thursday morning & then not till Saturday morning. I don’t think I will let him suck any more. I do feel so sorry for him when he begs to suck. I hate to turn away & try to amuse him as he soon forgets it & goes to play. He is no trouble at night as he has not sucked any at night for a month. This has been a very wet Spring. Farmers are all behind with their work. I hear the clover & grass seed sown this Spring are doing very well and the clover in the Hotel garden is very nice and is the only feed for our work stock as all the grain is given to the needy for bread. The need of grain is very great and it will be very hard for all to get bread this season. We went to the Murray place, had a pleasant walk. It was rather warm going. We came back & got some strawberries this side of the spring. Nearly sundown when we got back. Two men stay here tonight. Old Draper is one. He is the same man that was here about a month ago. Capt. Parker robbed him & the man that is with him. Rained some this evening.

 

Source: Diary of Cornelia Henry in Fear in North Carolina: The Civil War Journal and Letters of the Henry Family. Clinard, Karen L. and Russell, Richard, eds. (Asheville, NC: Reminiscing Books, 2008).

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Notice

Runaway on the 19th inst., my negro boy CALVIN. He is 30 years of age, he has a bad set of teeth, is 5 feet 9 or 10 inches high, weight 150 lbs. He took with him several suits of clothing – one brown jeans frock coat, &etc. Also, on the same night, Eli R. Wiley’s Stallion was stolen. I think my boy took him. I lost a bridle and saddle; it was a blind bridle, but the blinds were cut off; the saddle nearly worn out, without any pad. The horse was a bay, black mane and tail; both hind feet white; a white spot on his back; has gear marks on him; is 7 or 8 years old; hind legs rather crooked; he had no shoes on. I think the boy will try to pass for a free boy and get into the cavalry, the more easily to escape to the Yankees.

A liberal reward will be paid for the negro or horse. My post-office is Young Mills, Guilford County, NC

O.L. Boon

 

Source: Greensborough Patriot June 2, 1864 as found on www.ncecho.org

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Tuesday 17th [May 1864]

I have done nothing but knit a little today. My head aches some this evening. Betsey left here this evening. There was a man found dead in the Starnes settlement this morning, said to be Pinck Allen. Mr. Henry went up this evening to see him. They have taken him to Mrs. Norman’s. He is shot through the body under the arms. His sisters & wife take it very hard. He has been lying on nearly a year & stealing generally. He will steal no more in the world. May God temper the wind to the shorn lamb. Help his wife bear her great trouble.

 

Source: Diary of Cornelia Henry in Fear in North Carolina: The Civil War Journal and Letters of the Henry Family. Clinard, Karen L. and Russell, Richard, eds. (Asheville, NC: Reminiscing Books, 2008).

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May 14, 1864 (cont’d)

From Louisianna we hear that Banks has retreated to Alexandria. The Yankee Gunboat Eastport has been blown up & two transport’s captured. The remainder of the fleet is above the Rapids with no chance of escaping. Taylor had captured four thousand prisoners. Price’s success was complete. Marmaduke had captured Steele’s white waggon train. Steele was surrounded. Price demanded his surrender. He acceeded on condition that the negroes be treated as prisoners of war. Price refused & the terms were referred to Kirby Smith who replied “that the negroes should be sent to their owners.” Steele refused to capitulate. Smith was reinforcing Price & it was thought Steele would soon be glad to accept the rejected terms as he was surrounded & without supplies. We have retaken Fort De Russy & Cheneville. The enemy made a stand at Markham but were defeated with heavy loss. Their reinforcements by the river were driven back at Fort de Russy, four gunboats were burned above the falls, & Walker had crossed Red River & was marching South in pursuit of the retreating army. The destruction of property has been immense. Our forces burned the cotton, in anticipation of the enemy’s advance, & the Yankees destroyed private property, dwellings, barns, Gins, Churches — everything in short which could be burned in revenge. The course of their army is a blackened desert, women & children turned out homeless & desolate to perish by the wayside!

In N C Gen Hoke invested New Berne & delayed his attack for the arrival of the Albermarle when heavy firing told him she was engaged on her own element & in the mean time came “the necessity for him to move off,” which we interpret to mean orders to leave New Berne & concentrate in Va, which he has now done. Before marching he tried a coup de main & summoned the garrison to surrender. They demanded four hours to consider it but unfortunately discovered before the time had expired that we were preparing to move off and so refused and Hoke had not time to make them, or in the words of the Courier to give them another “Hoke ache” (hoe cake). He cut their communications with Morehead City & but for the attack on the Albemarle in all probability New Berne would have been in our hands before he was ordered to Richmond as their force is but a small one. Amongst the prisoners captured at Plymouth was the brother of Mrs. Hamilton Polk — Beach of Hartford the second in command. A comentary on this war truly — Brother seems against Brother, tho in this instance it is against brother-in-Law.

Flusser was not, it appears, the immaculate man of honour the Yankees represented him. It admits of proof that with his own commissioned hand he stole Miss Russel’s watch & the inside, the works & jewels, of her sister Mrs Griffin’s from the watch maker’s in Hertford where they had been sent for repair. The jeweler secreted the case of Mrs G’s watch, he having the interior in his work bench in the act of repairing it when Lieut Commander Flusser USN came into his shop & took it. Miss Russel is now residing temporarily in Scotland Neck with my neighbor Mrs Whitaker & her exclamation on hearing of his death was “well now I hope he will have to answer for stealing my watch”! Pattie tells me that he has been seen to chase chickens through the streets of Hertford in full uniform — actually to sully his commissin by chicken stealing! He met his death whilst attempting to drop a bombshell down the smoke stack of the Albermarle! Whilst lighting a slow match the shell exploded in his hand and he was blown into peices.

The official Dispatch of Capt Cooke’s late fight tells us that he encountered nine of the enemy’s Gunboats, two of them very large, from the blockading Squadron. He sunk the largest, disabled two others without serious injury to the Albemarle, but lost his tender. We heard of seven gunboats & four small steamers, but it seems he has done better. The iron clad built at Wilmington, “the Raleigh,” bearing the broad person of Com Lynch steamed out of Cape Fear & dispersed the blockading squadron there, much to the astonishment of the Yankees. She thinks she disabled one as a shot struck her fairly. She was out for hours & not a Yankee came in sight after their flight until she was back in the river again.

Source: Edmondston, Catherine Ann Devereux, 1823-1875, Journal of a Secesh Lady: The Diary of Catherine Ann Devereux Edmondston 1860-1866. Crabtree, Beth G and Patton, James W., (Raleigh, NC: North Carolina Division of Archives and History, 1979).http://nc-historical-publications.stores.yahoo.net/478.html

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Tuesday 10th [May 1864]

I began my calico dress today, did but little to it. The sleeves are made after a pattern I got from Till yesterday. I will frill the cap & around the waist. It is gathered on top. Mr. Henry got the dress last Spring in Columbia, gave $3.50 a yd. I thought that high, but now calico is selling at ten dollars a yard. Mr. Henry received his resignation accepted. I am so very glad, now he will stay at home. He did not go to Asheville today as he is relieved from the court marshal. An old man stayed here last night, night that Capt. Parker robbed in Cherokee. Mr. Henry knew him, named Draper. He will stay here till Thursday & then he has to go to Asheville again.

 

Wednesday 11th [May 1864]

I sewed on my dress today, finished the sleeves. They look very nice. Rained nearly all day today. Several men here tonight. Edwards will finish the sheep tomorrow. Old Bently has been here this week breaking flax, still at it. The fight began at Richmond the 6th. We are victors so far. I hope we may be able to whip them good there & that peace may soon dawn on our bleeding country. Oh Lord help us in this our great conflict. Give our men courage & our Generals wisdom. May we come out conquerors & Oh Lord I pray Thee grant us a speedy peace.

 

 

Source: Diary of Cornelia Henry in Fear in North Carolina: The Civil War Journal and Letters of the Henry Family. Clinard, Karen L. and Russell, Richard, eds. (Asheville, NC: Reminiscing Books, 2008).

 

 

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Friday 29th [May 1864]

I received a letter by hand from Mr. Henry this morning, also his saddle bags & dirty clothes. He is very well & will be at home by the 5th of May. I will try to wait patiently till then. Mrs. Hutsell was here a while this evening. I finished my dress this evening. It has cuffs of a dark stuff, also belt & pockets trimmed of the same & buttons up the skirt. It fits beautifully. Betsey McKinnish got another sley today of Mr. Norman to weave my cloth in. I think this one will do. I wrote a few lines to Mr. Henry this morning by Mull, telling him about Hendrix killing them.

Source: Diary of Cornelia Henry in Fear in North Carolina: The Civil War Journal and Letters of the Henry Family. Clinard, Karen L. and Russell, Richard, eds. (Asheville, NC: Reminiscing Books, 2008).

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