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Posts Tagged ‘weaving’

Tuesday 18th [October 1864]

I have knit and read today. Reading “The Deserted Wife,” ‘tis very interesting. I thought of going to see Belle today but Mr. Henry’s teeth pain him so at night I will not go till they get better.  He is so kind to stay with me when I am unwell. I will wait on him & try to get him well.

 

Saturday 22nd [October 1864]

I went to town on Wednesday & came back Thursday evening. Mr. Henry took Willie, Gus & I. Rose walked to the bridge. We worked the Neilson horse to the buggy for the first time, he seems to be gentle. Hanes came after me, brought Zona so we had a buggy full of children. Rose rode behind, I sit up till two o’clock at Mollie’s Wednesday night. Bell is getting better. Eliza & I went up after supper. Willie & Gus were both asleep. Rose carried Gus & Bill Willie. I had the headache all day Thursday, took a long nap at Sister Jane’s. Mr. Neilson came home Wednesday night. I had headache all day Friday but did not go to bed for it. I knit and finished reading “The Desert Wife.” Matt is weaving. I have been doing odds & ends today and nothing generally. Mr. Henry brought Starnes lien last Thursday, he came this morning. Gave 3000$ in Confederate money.

Source: Diary of Cornelia Henry in Fear in North Carolina: The Civil War Journal and Letters of the Henry Family. Clinard, Karen L. and Russell, Richard, eds. (Asheville, NC: Reminiscing Books, 2008).

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Saturday 24th [September 1864]

Tena put the starch to sun today. We had one little shower & then fair. Mrs. Emaline Luther spent the day here. She came to see Mr. Henry. He was gone to town. She waited till he came home. He got back about three o’clock. I have knit all day. Elsie weaving today. Aunt Tena wove yesterday. Tis said that Gen. Early met with a defeat near Winchester the other day. I am sorry if it ‘tis so. Mr. Henry brought the mail today. I received a letter from Ell & they were all well. Dora had gone to see Powell’s relations. Fowler was home on furlough.

 

Source: Diary of Cornelia Henry in Fear in North Carolina: The Civil War Journal and Letters of the Henry Family. Clinard, Karen L. and Russell, Richard, eds. (Asheville, NC: Reminiscing Books, 2008).

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September 19, 1864

Came Amo back from Raleigh on Sat jaded & worn out. He brought good accounts of Hood’s army from an intelligent officer with whom he “fore gathered” in his journey. The army is in fine spirits, well disiplined, & defiant, but long for Johnston to be again at their head. They do not undervalue Hood & he possesses their confidence & affection but in a less degree than Joe Johnston whom they all look upon not only as unequaled in strategy but as martyr to personal ill will, either of the President or some one high in his influence. Rumour whispers that Mrs Davis has much to do with it, that Mrs Johnston and herself do not visit whilst Mrs Bragg is her warm personal friend. I must believe, however, that Mr Davis is superior to such influences. He is not a man to be led by a “Commercia Major” & has the good of the country too much at heart to sacrifice it to personal pique. If he makes mistakes, & who that is mortal does not?, they are honest ones!

Patrick sent Amo some Turnip seed sometime since with directions to sell them & divide the proceeds for his trouble. He brought us on our portion in the shape of Sugar [ — ] lbs of the seed buying [ — ] lbs of Sugar — the one being sold for $[ — ] and the other bought at $6, so ten lbs of sugar standing normally at $60 cost us only [ — ] lbs of turnip seed, for which we have no use & which we never before sold! Indeed barter has become the order of the day. We pay for our weaving in Lard! Two lbs of Lard pays for the weaving of 2 yds of coarse cloth & recently two of our neighbors, Mrs Peter & Mrs Ben Smith, desiring to carry their children for change of air to the up country could get board only on promising to pay for it in Bacon & Lard, and part of their baggage actually consisted of bags of bacon and kegs of lard! Spartan simplicity. The Yankees are endeavouring to force our authorities into a special exchange of prisoners by placing our officers in a Stockade on Morris island outside of Gregg & Wagner & exposed to our fire. They want their officers but not their men & tho we have expressed a desire & have done all that in us lay to effect a general exchange of all prisoners they refuse to accede to it, raising innumerable difficulties & now demanding that we shall surrender our own slaves, captured from them, in return for our free white citizens captured by them. Our government refuses to admit the status of negroes to be equal to that of whites & claim that when we recapture slaves they are ours & return at once to their normal state. Butler has written a letter on the subject, distinguished only for bad Logic & impertinence, which I hope Mr Ould will treat with the contempt it deserves.

Source: Edmondston, Catherine Ann Devereux, 1823-1875, Journal of a Secesh Lady: The Diary of Catherine Ann Devereux Edmondston 1860-1866. Crabtree, Beth G and Patton, James W., (Raleigh, NC: North Carolina Division of Archives and History, 1979).http://nc-historical-publications.stores.yahoo.net/478.html

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Tuesday 23rd to Friday 26th August [1864]

I went to town last Tuesday to see Dora. She is quite sick. I enjoyed the day finely. I went and came alone and as usual, came home with a severe headache. It was not entirely well this morning but now all well once again. I have knit some in the three past days, only a little of that. I am knitting Zona some stockings. Eliza Patton got the cloth started last Tuesday for the negro’s dresses. It looks very well. Mrs. Fanning got out the flannel Monday evening. Matt’s books came today. “Lady Audley’s Secret” & “Robert & Harrald.”  I have spent most of the day in reading “Rober &c.,”  ‘tis very interesting. A good deal of mail this morning but little news. “Tis reported that Wheeler is in Sherman’s hair. I hope ‘tis true.

Source: Diary of Cornelia Henry in Fear in North Carolina: The Civil War Journal and Letters of the Henry Family. Clinard, Karen L. and Russell, Richard, eds. (Asheville, NC: Reminiscing Books, 2008).

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Hand Towel

Hand towel made by Adeline Loftin of Denton, NC in 1863. NC Museum of History.

Hand towel made by Adeline Loftin of Denton, NC in 1863. NC Museum of History.

Lace detail, hand towel made by Adeline Loftin of Denton, NC in 1863. NC Museum of History.

Lace detail, hand towel made by Adeline Loftin of Denton, NC in 1863. NC Museum of History.

White hand towel with crocheted lace.  Family tradition said that the towel was made by Adeline Loftin of Denton, NC in 1863.  Ms. Loftin grew the flax, spun the yarn, wove the fabric, and crocheted the lace.

 

Source: Museum of History Collection, accession number 2005.170.1

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Thursday 18th [August 1864]

I have a slight headache all day & yesterday too. I finished my dress this evening. Matt has sewed on Mr. Henry’s coat. Betsey Jamison was here this evening, staid a short time. The children learn fast & are a dear good set of wee ones. Mrs. Fanning gets on slowly with the flannel as she has warped a piece for us and one for herself this week.

 

Friday 19th [August 1864]

I am twenty eight years old today. Getting up in years smartly. I finished the coat this evening. My head has not been easy since Tuesday. Matt fills quills for Mrs. Fanning. No news of importance this morning. I do hope we will be able to whip the yanks good at Atlanta.

 

Source: Diary of Cornelia Henry in Fear in North Carolina: The Civil War Journal and Letters of the Henry Family. Clinard, Karen L. and Russell, Richard, eds. (Asheville, NC: Reminiscing Books, 2008).

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Wednesday 17th [August 1864]

Eliza Patton came here Monday & spooled. I had the piece of flannel ready for the loom Tuesday. Eliza Patten worked till Tuesday at dinner. He & Tena got through spooling both pieces. She then went home. I began today my muslin dress Sister Jane gave me. Matt helped me some. It is made garabaldi waist. Mr. Henry went to town today & got his linen coat cut.

Source: Diary of Cornelia Henry in Fear in North Carolina: The Civil War Journal and Letters of the Henry Family. Clinard, Karen L. and Russell, Richard, eds. (Asheville, NC: Reminiscing Books, 2008).

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