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Death of Captain Muse

On Friday morning Capt. W.T. Muse, commander of the Confederate iron-clad gun boat North Carolina, died in this town of typhoid fever. Capt. Muse was a gallant and meritorious officer, a noble and high toned gentleman. When the present war broke out he promptly resigned his position in the US Navy and tendered his services to North Carolina, his native State, serving in the State navy until that was incorporated in the navy of the Confederate States. Few men made more sacrifices for the cause than Capt Muse, as his property was situated near Alexandria, and has been, almost from the first, in possession of the enemy; and none made them more cheerfully or were more devoted to the cause or more confident of its final success.

On Saturday his remains were escorted to the Depot of the Wilmington & Weldon Railroad with naval and military honors. They were there placed on board the cars to be carried to Warren county for internment. Capt. Muse was in the 52d year of his age.

Wilmington Journal

Source: Fayetteville Observer, April 14, 1864 as found on www.ncecho.org

Indiscreet Gratitude

Citizens or soldiers, or escaping prisoners, who may receive kindness and assistance from friends outside of our lines, are naturally prone to express their gratitude publicly; and in some cases the particularity of their description almost identifies those by whom they have been aided. We have received a message for our people and the press from one thus situated, imploring us all to avoid a course so fatal to our friends. Let it be announced even in general terms that citizens in this place or that place gave comfort to a Confederate, and immediately Lincoln’s curs are set upon them, and his spies posted on all their paths. That gratitude is kindest, and therefore, most sincere, which is most silent now; the time will come when we may speak to the praise of our friends without unloosing wild beasts against them. Till then let us be content to wear them in our hearts.

Richmond Sentinel

Source: Fayetteville Observer, April 14, 1864 as found on www.ncecho.org

$100 Reward

Ranaway from my Salt Works, Lockwood’s Folly, Brunswick County, about 25th February, my boy DAVE, 5 feet 10 inches high, 22 years of age; the ends of his two middle fingers off of his right hand; he is near copper color. No doubt he is lurking about Wilmington, as he was working around the wharves there for the blockade runners last week. I will pay the above reward for his confinement in jail so I can get him.

A.G. Thornton

 

Source: Fayetteville Observer, April 14, 1864 as found on www.ncecho.org

Second National Flag, headquarters flag for Major General Robert F. Hoke of Lincolnton, NC.  Hoke was wounded at the Battle of Chancellorsville in May 1863.  By April 1864 he was in command of forces who successfully re-captured Plymouth.  This flag has a white canvas staff edge with “Hoke” written on ink on it.  Machine sewn, appliqued stars.  The flag and other personal items were given to the Museum by Hoke before his death.

 

North Carolina Museum of History Collections, Accession Number 1914.89.8

Second National Confederate Flag, Headquarters flag of Major General Robert F. Hoke. NC Museum of History Collections

Second National Confederate Flag, Headquarters flag of Major General Robert F. Hoke. NC Museum of History Collections

Tuesday 12th April 1864

I made another gown for Gus today of old stuff. It will last while & such times as these we have to make everything count that will. Mr. Henry does not have to go to Asheville for a few days. He went to Asheville today. No further news from Laurel. I do wish we could once again have peace. We surely would do better that we did before this war but I fear that day is still far distant. God grant us peace I pray.

 

Wednesday 13th [April 1864]

I have done some mending today. Mr.s Fanning is here helping to spool a piece of cloth, mine & Matt’s dresses. ‘Tis one & one of pine bark dye & pale copperas. A crazey woman was here today named Rogers from Haywood Co. She has some sense, not much though. Mr. Henry at home today. I wish he could stay all the time.

Source: Diary of Cornelia Henry in Fear in North Carolina: The Civil War Journal and Letters of the Henry Family. Clinard, Karen L. and Russell, Richard, eds. (Asheville, NC: Reminiscing Books, 2008).

Sunday 10th [April 1864]

Wind from the North today. Cool. Peach blossoms getting out & the grass in the yard beginning to look green. Miss Ruth & Ellen Jones spent this day here. They are nice girls. Mr. Henry is asleep in my room. Willie & Zona at play. Matt, Ruth & Ellen out talking. My head feels unwell yet. I fear I shall have another attack. I am lean & feeble. Oh! that I could enjoy good health, I would be so thankful. We did not go to walk this evening. Matt & Zona went a piece with Ruth & Ellen. It was dark when they got back.

Source: Diary of Cornelia Henry in Fear in North Carolina: The Civil War Journal and Letters of the Henry Family. Clinard, Karen L. and Russell, Richard, eds. (Asheville, NC: Reminiscing Books, 2008).

Saturday 9th April 1864

I have suffered a great deal with my head in the past four days. I was in bed nearly all day Wednesday. Thursday it was a little better. I eat some dinner & I suffered a great deal that night. It was near 12 o’clock before I got to sleep. It really seemed my head would burst. Mrs. Snelson & husband spent the day here. Friday I was in bed nearly all day. Mr. Henry staid with me all day. He had a leather bottom put in the rocking chair yesterday for my comfort. He is the best husband in the world, so kind to me & my dear children. I hope I may life to raise them but I fear unless my health improves, I will have to leave them for some one else to raise. ‘Tis a sad thought to me. I feel much better today. Sat up all day & knit some & finished my gown I began last Tuesday. Mr. Henry went to Asheville today & all his detail. They go to Marshall on Monday. I hope Mr. Henry will not have to go. The tories have been robbing some down there again. The men lay around Allen’s house till Friday evening. Mr. Henry came home Wednesday when he heard I was sick. Rained all day yesterday. It seems we will not get much work done on the farm as ‘tis too wet to plough. They are still sowing oats. We have had a great deal of rain in the last two weeks.

Source: Diary of Cornelia Henry in Fear in North Carolina: The Civil War Journal and Letters of the Henry Family. Clinard, Karen L. and Russell, Richard, eds. (Asheville, NC: Reminiscing Books, 2008).

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