Feeds:
Posts
Comments

July 30, 1864

On the 27th came Mr Dunlop of Petersburg bringing his daughter Mattie to remain with us whilst the city is undergoing so furious a bombardment. Poor man, he has cause for deep anxiety, his own home beleaguered & liable at any moment to be blown up, his wife and two daughters persisting in remaining there — rather than endure the miseries of refuge-ism, the rest of his family scattered, one son severely wounded, others in the army, whilst his eldest daughter, a married woman, lives in Atlanta & is exposed to all the horrors of a city in a state of seige, shells flying about her hourly. His cup seems full without the addition of the immense cost of the merest necessaries of life. The expense to which he is now put merely to live would, if long continued, seriously embarrass a princely fortune. What blessings we enjoy! Grant O heavenly Father that they fall not on unthankful hearts! May our lives be a hymn of Praise to Thee for Thy goodness to us!

All as usual before Petersburg. Grant is not dead as reported by deserters but still lives to burrow under our earth works & shell a city occupied only by women & children & filled with Hospitals! In the valley Gen Ramseur has met with a reverse which has nipped his growing promotion in the bud. It is a muddled affair, but it seems he led a division sent out to reconnoitre, threw out neither scouts or skirmishers, & walked open eyed into an ambuscade in which he lost heavily both in guns & prisoners. He is much blamed, but where is an unfortunate general who is not? Next day, however, Early repaired his mishap. On the now classic ground of Kernstown he fell upon Hunter & put him to the most ignominious rout. The panic equaled that of the first Manassas. We recaptured guns & prisoners, taking scores of Yankees by way of reprisal, drove him pell mell into & out of Martinsburg which we reoccupy, and our army now stands at Harper’s Ferry in attitude of advance, but whether again on Washington or into Penn we outsiders cannot tell, but advance it will.

Grant has recalled the troops he detached to defend Washington, needing more than he can get, & under Hunter has collected all the available force left in Maryland. These are now but a routed & disorganized & disjointed mass, so Early & Breckenridge can repair the blunders made in their late attack & let us reap more substantial fruits of victory than forage & horses. Peace seems to be sending its shadow ahead, as recently two southern Gentlemen & that political adventurer Geo N Saunders associated themselves together & addressed a letter to Greely demanding a safe conduct to Washington to discuss the preliminaries of Peace. It is needless for me to enter into all the detail of their correspondance. Suffice it that Messrs Clay of Ala, Holcombe of Va, & Saunders of Dixie met with a most decided rebuff at the hands of Mr Lincoln, he telling them in a paper addressed with Machievelli-like craft “To all whom it may concern,” that the safe conduct should be granted if the Confederate States were willing to renounce slavery, return to the allegiance of the U S, lay down arms, in short give up all we are fighting for & submit ourselves to his royal clemency.  Balderdash!

Simultaneously with the debut of these self constituted Commissioners, two Yankees, one a Rev Col, the other an Abolition penny-a-liner, make their appearance in Richmond, are entertained at the Spotswood House, have two interviews with Pres Davis, and leave as they entered.  To whom they were accredited does not appear, but certainly to some one less impersonal than “To All whom it may concern,” or they would never have seen Mr Davis. We get only Northern accounts of their interview and as I do not beleive what the Yankees say I will not record them. I cannot avoid saying, however, that I think the self styled “Southern commissioners” might have found a more worthy channel through which to attempt to open negotiations than that wretch Greely! “Can a man touch pitch and not be defiled?” Peace itself would be sullied in passing through his hands.

Matters before Atlanta cause us grave anxiety. Sherman is shelling the place. Hood has again repulsed him & Forrest has broken up his communications, but he seems not to flag in consequence. McPherson, said to be the ablest man in the Yankee service, was killed in the recent battle, which seems now to have been more bloody than we had thought. The Yankees admit a loss of 15,000 & say we lost 7000. I know not how it is. McPherson’s Laurels, it is said, are worn by Maj Gen Grant. To him is due all the credit of the advance & attack on Vicksburg. If so I hope Sherman will feel his loss.

Source: Edmondston, Catherine Ann Devereux, 1823-1875, Journal of a Secesh Lady: The Diary of Catherine Ann Devereux Edmondston 1860-1866. Crabtree, Beth G and Patton, James W., (Raleigh, NC: North Carolina Division of Archives and History, 1979).http://nc-historical-publications.stores.yahoo.net/478.html

Yadkinville

July 30, 1864

Maj. J.R. McLean

Camp Vance

 

Major:

My attention has been called by Mrs. Speer to your letter of the 27th to her husband, the Sheriff. The Sheriff is absent and will be for a day or two and Mrs. Davis leaves here this morning for Camp Vance. I write to give you some information in regard to the “Yadkin refugees” now in your custody.

There are bills of indictment and capiases in the hands of the Sheriff against Wm, Lee and Ben Willard for the murder of James West & John Williams in the School House fight. Also against Enoch Brown and Hardee Allgood who are said to have been captured with the Willards. These men are all conscripts and have been ordered into service and one of them, Allgood, is a deserter from the Army. It will not do to send them to the county to be imprisoned, our jail is entirely unsafe, to say nothing of the danger of their being rescued by their friends as heretofore. Elkaha did assist in forcing the jail a few weeks ago as can be proven. He did not try to disguise himself.

A very important question is, what is to be done with the balance of these men who went off in that company with the Willards. It is worse than idle to send them to the army, better turn them loose here, because if sent to the army they will be certain to desert and will bring arms with them and perhaps induce others to desert. Doubtless, some better meaning men were persuaded off with them, but very few. If these men are allowed to get back to this country, we are now in a fair way to clean it out. At least the prospect is better than it ever has been. If they come back we shall have terrible times. As to what should be done with the Willards I can only suggest that they be kept in some very safe place until some action is taken in the matter.

Very Truly

W.A. Joyce

I concur with the above. The Willards must not come back, and if they are sent to the army they will come.

Jos.Dobson

I concur fully in this letter

R.F. Armfield

 

Source: Christopher Watford, ed. The Civil War in North Carolina: Soldiers’ and Civilians’ Letters and Diaries, 1861-1865, Volume 1.  Original in the Clewell Letters, North Carolina State Archives.

 

The story of the “Bond School House Affair” can be found in Frances Harding Casstevens” The Civil War and Yadkin County, North Carolina: A History. http://books.google.com/books?id=VLWLlOHsVIMC&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f=false

Fearful Railroad Catastrophe

Lackawaxen, Penn, July 15

A train with about eight hundred and fifty rebel prisoners, on their way to the camp at Elmira, collided with the Pennsylvania coal company’s train between here and Shohola this afternoon, killing and wounding a large number, reported at over one hundred.

The train with the prisoners should have left Jersey City this morning at half past four, but was delayed and thrown out of time one hour by the captain of the guard, who returned to the vessel on which they came from City Point to hunt up three prisoners, who had escaped from him.

The coal train was on its way from the Hawley Branch to Port Jervis, and neglected to ascertain that the other train was behind time, and went on, striking the latter at a crooked part of the road, where the engineer could not see far enough ahead to avoid the calamity.

The Herald of later date says that 16 yankees were killed and 17 wounded. Of the Confederate prisoners [from Point Lookout] 49 were killed and 68 wounded.

 

Source: Fayetteville Observer, July 28, 1864 as found on www.ncecho.org

 

Cheap Door Mats

Cut any old woolen articles into long strips, from one to two inches broad. Braid three of these together, and sew the braid in gradually increasing circles till large enough.

Source: Confederate Receipt Book. A Compilation of Over 100 Receipts, Adapted to the Times. (Richmond, Virginia: West & Johnston, 1863)

Braided rug. No date.  NC State Historic Sites, accession number 1962.14.3.

Braided rug. No date. NC State Historic Sites, accession number 1962.14.3.

Homemade coat features homespun lining. Collections of the North Carolina Museum of History, accession number 1965.78.1

Homemade coat features homespun lining.
Collections of the North Carolina Museum of History, accession number 1965.78.1

Uniform Coat

 

Used in the Civil War by Dixon G. Conn of Raleigh.  Damage to the upper arm of coat is evidence of a wound sustained by Conn at the Malvern Hill, July 1, 1862. Although Conn was severaly wounded in the shoulder, hip, thigh, and leg, he returned to duty for a brief period at the end of 1862 but was discharged in early 1863 by reason of disability from his wounds.

Conn was first mustered in as a private with the 15th NC State Troops (later Company K 32nd NCST) and later promoted to First Sergeant.

Homemade coat features homespun lining. Non-original CSA buttons (1870-1880 reproductions)

Homemade coat features homespun lining.  Collections of the North Carolina Museum of History, accession number 1965.78.1

Homemade coat features homespun lining.
Collections of the North Carolina Museum of History, accession number 1965.78.1

Homemade coat features homespun lining.  Collections of the North Carolina Museum of History, accession number 1965.78.1

Homemade coat features homespun lining.
Collections of the North Carolina Museum of History, accession number 1965.78.1

Collections of the North Carolina Museum of History, accession number 1965.78.1

Thursday 28th [July 1864]

I finished Mr. Henry’s pants & mended some this evening. My head aches a good deal this evening. I think ‘tis from eating black berry pie at dinner. Anon Jones here for dinner today. He has just left. We are having a very good shower for the corn but I fear it will injure the oats. Tena is spinning wool to make Eugenia’s flannel of the mareno wool. It is very fine & soft. Mr. Henry sent Pinck & Lonzo to town last Tuesday after a newspaper. They staid all day as Pinck loaned Mollie Henry John to come to the farm. They took Sister Jane some apples & brought back a white rabbit in the basket. William Tidwell sent it to Zona. It is a beautiful pet. It stays upstairs. I am going to have a cage made for it. The children are delighted with it.

 

Source: Diary of Cornelia Henry in Fear in North Carolina: The Civil War Journal and Letters of the Henry Family. Clinard, Karen L. and Russell, Richard, eds. (Asheville, NC: Reminiscing Books, 2008).

 

Wednesday 27th [July 1864]

I began Mr. Henry’s flax pants today. Anon Jones spent the day here. Mr. Henry in the oats all day. Cloudy today with a little rain this evening. Corn is needed rain a little now. The children are learning very fast. I teach them morning & evening. Zona can read in three letters & Pinck can read & spell very well.

 

Source: Diary of Cornelia Henry in Fear in North Carolina: The Civil War Journal and Letters of the Henry Family. Clinard, Karen L. and Russell, Richard, eds. (Asheville, NC: Reminiscing Books, 2008).

 

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,542 other followers